Arabic script of written malay

Innovative transformations towards a less complex reading process

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A lot of efforts have been made by the Malaysian government to address today's lack of usage of the Arabic alphabet for writing the Malay language (i.e., Jawi) and making it popular among Malaysians. Many J-QAF (Jawi, Qur'an, Arab dan Fardhu 'Ain) teachers have been recruited to at least get Muslim primary school children today to learn Jawi formally. Nevertheless, this 700-year-old script continues to be marginalised by the population and is currently only perceived as a national heritage that is only used by the "more conservative" Malays in religious discourse. Thus, an effort to understand the root cause of why Jawi continues to be marginalised by the majority of Malaysians was conducted (Salehuddin, 2012) and by assessing the cognitive complexity of Jawi, especially in reading the script, Salehuddin (2012) carefully lists factors that lead to the complexity in reading this derived Arabic script. Following the assessment on the cognitive complexity of Jawi, the current paper puts forward some innovative solutions that can be introduced to Jawi to help reduce the cognitive complexity faced by its readers in the reading process. It is hoped that with an innovative transformation in the features of Jawi, this script will slowly regain its popularity and will ultimately be widely used in the Malay Archipelago.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-76
Number of pages14
JournalPertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

schoolchild
popularity
primary school
Muslim
cause
Arabic Script
Process of Reading
discourse
lack
teacher
language
Cognitive complexity
School children
Religious Discourse
Causes
Government
National Heritage
Language
Primary School
Alphabet

Keywords

  • Arabic script
  • Cognitive complexity
  • Jawi
  • National heritage
  • Psycholinguistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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