Apolipoprotein L1 and kidney transplantation

Fasika M. Tedla, Ernie Yap

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of reviewConsistent associations between variants of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) gene and nondiabetic nephropathy have been reported in individuals of African descent. Donor APOL1 genotype has also been linked to shorter renal allograft survival. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the biology of APOL1 and their implications to kidney donors and recipients.Recent findingsApproximately 12-13% of African Americans have two renal risk APOL1 variants but most do not develop kidney disease. Although the exact mechanisms linking APOL1 genotype to renal injury are not known, evidence from new experimental models suggests APOL1 mutations may accelerate age-related podocyte loss. Recent epidemiological studies indicate potential kidney donors with high-risk APOL1 variants have increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and donors with high-risk APOL1 variants have lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than those with low-risk variants. The absolute risk of CKD in otherwise healthy individuals carrying high-risk APOL1 mutations is likely low.SummaryRecent studies suggest high-risk APOL1 mutations in kidney donors are linked to shorter graft survival and lower postdonation eGFR. APOL1 genotyping may be used as one of many factors that contribute to assessment of the risk of postdonation CKD and informed decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Apolipoproteins
Kidney Transplantation
Kidney
Tissue Donors
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Mutation
Genotype
Podocytes
Kidney Diseases
Graft Survival
African Americans
Allografts
Epidemiologic Studies
Decision Making
Theoretical Models

Keywords

  • apolipoprotein L1
  • high-risk variant
  • kidney donor
  • kidney transplant
  • trypanosome lytic factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Apolipoprotein L1 and kidney transplantation. / Tedla, Fasika M.; Yap, Ernie.

In: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 97-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tedla, Fasika M. ; Yap, Ernie. / Apolipoprotein L1 and kidney transplantation. In: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 97-102.
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