Antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nosocomial infections in critically ill patients are associated with higher risk of mortality. Effective antimicrobial treatment is important to ensure a better overall outcome for the patients. This study evaluated the effect of initial antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia and bloodstream infections. Data was collected retrospectively from patients who were admitted in 2007 in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care Malaysian hospital. The mean age of the study cohort was 50.8 ± 21.8 years. The subjects had either nosocomial pneumonia (72%) or bloodstream infections (28%). Three common microorganisms isolated from the tracheal aspirate and blood samples were Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Appropriate initial antimicrobial agents were given to 60% of the subjects. Advanced age was associated with the less desirable treatment outcomes (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects who survived from nosocomial pneumonia and nosocomial bloodstream infections was 65.1% and 41.7%, respectively. Overall, the survival rate was higher in patients who received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy (97% versus 50%; p < 0.001). The results support the need for early appropriate antimicrobial treatment in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)340-342
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume3
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Cross Infection
Critical Illness
Pneumonia
Therapeutics
Acinetobacter
Tertiary Healthcare
Anti-Infective Agents
Infection
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Intensive Care Units
Staphylococcus aureus
Cohort Studies
Survival Rate
Mortality

Keywords

  • Antimicrobials
  • Critical care
  • Nosocomial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections",
abstract = "Nosocomial infections in critically ill patients are associated with higher risk of mortality. Effective antimicrobial treatment is important to ensure a better overall outcome for the patients. This study evaluated the effect of initial antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia and bloodstream infections. Data was collected retrospectively from patients who were admitted in 2007 in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care Malaysian hospital. The mean age of the study cohort was 50.8 ± 21.8 years. The subjects had either nosocomial pneumonia (72{\%}) or bloodstream infections (28{\%}). Three common microorganisms isolated from the tracheal aspirate and blood samples were Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Appropriate initial antimicrobial agents were given to 60{\%} of the subjects. Advanced age was associated with the less desirable treatment outcomes (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects who survived from nosocomial pneumonia and nosocomial bloodstream infections was 65.1{\%} and 41.7{\%}, respectively. Overall, the survival rate was higher in patients who received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy (97{\%} versus 50{\%}; p < 0.001). The results support the need for early appropriate antimicrobial treatment in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections.",
keywords = "Antimicrobials, Critical care, Nosocomial",
author = "{Makmor Bakry}, Mohd and Suzana Mustafa and Omar, {Marhanis Salihah}",
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AU - Makmor Bakry, Mohd

AU - Mustafa, Suzana

AU - Omar, Marhanis Salihah

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N2 - Nosocomial infections in critically ill patients are associated with higher risk of mortality. Effective antimicrobial treatment is important to ensure a better overall outcome for the patients. This study evaluated the effect of initial antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia and bloodstream infections. Data was collected retrospectively from patients who were admitted in 2007 in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care Malaysian hospital. The mean age of the study cohort was 50.8 ± 21.8 years. The subjects had either nosocomial pneumonia (72%) or bloodstream infections (28%). Three common microorganisms isolated from the tracheal aspirate and blood samples were Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Appropriate initial antimicrobial agents were given to 60% of the subjects. Advanced age was associated with the less desirable treatment outcomes (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects who survived from nosocomial pneumonia and nosocomial bloodstream infections was 65.1% and 41.7%, respectively. Overall, the survival rate was higher in patients who received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy (97% versus 50%; p < 0.001). The results support the need for early appropriate antimicrobial treatment in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections.

AB - Nosocomial infections in critically ill patients are associated with higher risk of mortality. Effective antimicrobial treatment is important to ensure a better overall outcome for the patients. This study evaluated the effect of initial antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia and bloodstream infections. Data was collected retrospectively from patients who were admitted in 2007 in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care Malaysian hospital. The mean age of the study cohort was 50.8 ± 21.8 years. The subjects had either nosocomial pneumonia (72%) or bloodstream infections (28%). Three common microorganisms isolated from the tracheal aspirate and blood samples were Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Appropriate initial antimicrobial agents were given to 60% of the subjects. Advanced age was associated with the less desirable treatment outcomes (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects who survived from nosocomial pneumonia and nosocomial bloodstream infections was 65.1% and 41.7%, respectively. Overall, the survival rate was higher in patients who received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy (97% versus 50%; p < 0.001). The results support the need for early appropriate antimicrobial treatment in critically ill patients with nosocomial infections.

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