Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, serotype distribution and virulence determinants among invasive, non-invasive and colonizing Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) from Malaysian patients

N. Eskandarian, Zalina Ismail, V. Neela, A. van Belkum, M. N M Desa, S. Amin Nordin

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Abstract

A total of 103 group B streptococci (GBS) including 22 invasive, 21 non-invasive, and 60 colonizing isolates were collected in a Malaysian hospital (June 2010–October 2011). Isolates were characterized by conventional and molecular serotyping and analyzed for scpB, lmb, hylB, cylE, bac, bca and rib gene content. Antimicrobial susceptibility to penicillins, macrolides, lincosamides, quinolones and tetracyclines was determined using disk diffusion and the MICs for penicillin were determined by E-test. Molecular serotyping for all eight serotypes (Ia, Ib, II–VII) was in full accordance with conventional serotyping. Overall, taking CS and MS together, serotype VI was the most common capsular type (22.3 %) followed by VII (21.4 %), III (20.4 %), Ia (17.5 %), V (9.7 %), II (7.7 %) and IV (1 %). Susceptibility to beta-lactam antimicrobials was prevalent (100 %). Resistance rates for erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline were 23.3 %, 17.5 % and 71.8 %, respectively. PCR-virulence gene screening showed the presence of cylE, lmb, scpB and hylB in almost all the isolates while rib, bca, and bac genes were found in 29.1 %, 14.6 % and 9.7 % of the isolates. Certain genes were significantly associated with specific serotypes, namely, rib with serotypes Ia, II, III and VI; bca and bac with serotypes II and III. Furthermore, serotype Ia was significantly more common among patients with invasive infections (p <0.01) and serotype VI isolates were significantly more common among carriers (p <0.05). In summary, serotype distribution correlates with virulence gene content will be useful in epidemiological studies and design of vaccines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579-584
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Mar 2015

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Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus
Virulence
Serotyping
Ribs
Genes
Penicillins
Lincosamides
Tetracyclines
Clindamycin
Serogroup
Quinolones
Macrolides
beta-Lactams
Erythromycin
Tetracycline
Epidemiologic Studies
Vaccines
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{d4acf62237ca4fccb5f8c35f8a349322,
title = "Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, serotype distribution and virulence determinants among invasive, non-invasive and colonizing Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) from Malaysian patients",
abstract = "A total of 103 group B streptococci (GBS) including 22 invasive, 21 non-invasive, and 60 colonizing isolates were collected in a Malaysian hospital (June 2010–October 2011). Isolates were characterized by conventional and molecular serotyping and analyzed for scpB, lmb, hylB, cylE, bac, bca and rib gene content. Antimicrobial susceptibility to penicillins, macrolides, lincosamides, quinolones and tetracyclines was determined using disk diffusion and the MICs for penicillin were determined by E-test. Molecular serotyping for all eight serotypes (Ia, Ib, II–VII) was in full accordance with conventional serotyping. Overall, taking CS and MS together, serotype VI was the most common capsular type (22.3 {\%}) followed by VII (21.4 {\%}), III (20.4 {\%}), Ia (17.5 {\%}), V (9.7 {\%}), II (7.7 {\%}) and IV (1 {\%}). Susceptibility to beta-lactam antimicrobials was prevalent (100 {\%}). Resistance rates for erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline were 23.3 {\%}, 17.5 {\%} and 71.8 {\%}, respectively. PCR-virulence gene screening showed the presence of cylE, lmb, scpB and hylB in almost all the isolates while rib, bca, and bac genes were found in 29.1 {\%}, 14.6 {\%} and 9.7 {\%} of the isolates. Certain genes were significantly associated with specific serotypes, namely, rib with serotypes Ia, II, III and VI; bca and bac with serotypes II and III. Furthermore, serotype Ia was significantly more common among patients with invasive infections (p <0.01) and serotype VI isolates were significantly more common among carriers (p <0.05). In summary, serotype distribution correlates with virulence gene content will be useful in epidemiological studies and design of vaccines.",
author = "N. Eskandarian and Zalina Ismail and V. Neela and {van Belkum}, A. and Desa, {M. N M} and {Amin Nordin}, S.",
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T1 - Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, serotype distribution and virulence determinants among invasive, non-invasive and colonizing Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) from Malaysian patients

AU - Eskandarian, N.

AU - Ismail, Zalina

AU - Neela, V.

AU - van Belkum, A.

AU - Desa, M. N M

AU - Amin Nordin, S.

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