Antibiotics for URTI and UTI: Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings

Cheong Lieng Teng, Tong Seng Fah, Ee Ming Khoo, Verna Lee, Abu Hassan Zailinawati, Omar Mimi, Wei Seng Chen, Salleh Nordin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Overprescription of antibiotics is a continuing problem in primary care. This study aims to assess the antibiotic prescribing rates and antibiotic choices for upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and urinary tract infections (UTI) in Malaysian primary care. Method: Antibiotic prescribing data for URTI and UTI was extracted from a morbidity survey of randomly selected primary care clinics in Malaysia. Results: Analysis was performed of 1163 URTI and 105 UTI encounters. Antibiotic prescribing rates for URTI and UTI were 33.8% and 57.1% respectively. Antibiotic prescribing rates were higher in private clinics compared to public clinics for URTI, but not for UTI. In URTI encounters, the majority of antibiotics prescribed were penicillins and macrolides, but penicillin V was notably underused. In UTI encounters, the antibiotics prescribed were predominantly penicillins or cotrimoxazole. Discussion: Greater effort is needed to bring about evidence based antibiotic prescribing in Malaysian primary care, especially for URTIs in private clinics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-329
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume40
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Urinary Tract Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
Primary Health Care
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Penicillins
Penicillin V
Malaysia
Macrolides
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Antibiotics
  • Drug
  • Evidence based medicine
  • General practice
  • Guideline
  • Prescriptions
  • Upper respiratory tract infection
  • Urinary tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Teng, C. L., Seng Fah, T., Khoo, E. M., Lee, V., Zailinawati, A. H., Mimi, O., ... Nordin, S. (2011). Antibiotics for URTI and UTI: Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings. Australian Family Physician, 40(5), 325-329.

Antibiotics for URTI and UTI : Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings. / Teng, Cheong Lieng; Seng Fah, Tong; Khoo, Ee Ming; Lee, Verna; Zailinawati, Abu Hassan; Mimi, Omar; Chen, Wei Seng; Nordin, Salleh.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 40, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 325-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teng, CL, Seng Fah, T, Khoo, EM, Lee, V, Zailinawati, AH, Mimi, O, Chen, WS & Nordin, S 2011, 'Antibiotics for URTI and UTI: Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings', Australian Family Physician, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 325-329.
Teng CL, Seng Fah T, Khoo EM, Lee V, Zailinawati AH, Mimi O et al. Antibiotics for URTI and UTI: Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings. Australian Family Physician. 2011 May;40(5):325-329.
Teng, Cheong Lieng ; Seng Fah, Tong ; Khoo, Ee Ming ; Lee, Verna ; Zailinawati, Abu Hassan ; Mimi, Omar ; Chen, Wei Seng ; Nordin, Salleh. / Antibiotics for URTI and UTI : Prescribing in Malaysian primary care settings. In: Australian Family Physician. 2011 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 325-329.
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