Antibiotic and shared decision-making preferences among adolescents in Malaysia

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline information on the current level of knowledge about, attitude toward, and experience with antibiotic usage, and prefer­ences for shared decision making among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey, involving 1,105 respondents who were aged between 13 and 17 years and who lived in Malaysia, was conducted using a validated questionnaire. The survey assessed knowledge, attitude, and experience with regard to antibiotic usage, and adolescents’ preferences for the style of shared decision-making process. Results: The majority (n=786 [71.13%]) of the respondents had a low level of knowledge, 296 (26.79%) had a moderate level of knowledge, and 23 (2.08%) had a high level of knowledge. Further, they demonstrated a slightly negative attitude mean score of 3.30±0.05 (range: 0–8 points) but a positive experience mean score of 2.90±0.029 (range: 0–4 points). There was a positive correlation between knowledge and attitude scores, with a higher knowledge level associated with a more positive attitude toward antibiotic usage (r=0.257, P0.001). Higher knowledge scores were associated with a more negative experience with antibiotic usage (r=-0.83, P=0.006). When assessing preference in shared decision making, more adolescents preferred an active role (n=408 [37%]) compared with collaborative (n=360 [32.6%]) or pas­sive (n=337 [30.5%]) (P=0.028) roles. Conclusion: Current health care settings should involve adolescents in the decision-making process. Education packages can be introduced to improve adolescents’ knowledge of and practice of taking antibiotics, as well as to encourage their participation in decision making, in an attempt to reduce misuse of antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)665-673
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 May 2015

Fingerprint

Malaysia
level of knowledge
Decision Making
Anti-Bacterial Agents
adolescent
decision making
decision-making process
experience
knowledge
health care
Cross-Sectional Studies
participation
questionnaire
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
education

Keywords

  • Antibiotic usage
  • Attitude
  • Experience
  • Knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{ce2f2b5a444d459c87fdac502d90750f,
title = "Antibiotic and shared decision-making preferences among adolescents in Malaysia",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline information on the current level of knowledge about, attitude toward, and experience with antibiotic usage, and prefer­ences for shared decision making among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey, involving 1,105 respondents who were aged between 13 and 17 years and who lived in Malaysia, was conducted using a validated questionnaire. The survey assessed knowledge, attitude, and experience with regard to antibiotic usage, and adolescents’ preferences for the style of shared decision-making process. Results: The majority (n=786 [71.13{\%}]) of the respondents had a low level of knowledge, 296 (26.79{\%}) had a moderate level of knowledge, and 23 (2.08{\%}) had a high level of knowledge. Further, they demonstrated a slightly negative attitude mean score of 3.30±0.05 (range: 0–8 points) but a positive experience mean score of 2.90±0.029 (range: 0–4 points). There was a positive correlation between knowledge and attitude scores, with a higher knowledge level associated with a more positive attitude toward antibiotic usage (r=0.257, P0.001). Higher knowledge scores were associated with a more negative experience with antibiotic usage (r=-0.83, P=0.006). When assessing preference in shared decision making, more adolescents preferred an active role (n=408 [37{\%}]) compared with collaborative (n=360 [32.6{\%}]) or pas­sive (n=337 [30.5{\%}]) (P=0.028) roles. Conclusion: Current health care settings should involve adolescents in the decision-making process. Education packages can be introduced to improve adolescents’ knowledge of and practice of taking antibiotics, as well as to encourage their participation in decision making, in an attempt to reduce misuse of antibiotics.",
keywords = "Antibiotic usage, Attitude, Experience, Knowledge",
author = "Ngadimon, {Irma Wati} and Islahudin, {Farida Hanim} and {Md Hatah}, Ernieda and {Mohamed Shah}, Noraida and {Makmor Bakry}, Mohd",
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AU - Ngadimon, Irma Wati

AU - Islahudin, Farida Hanim

AU - Md Hatah, Ernieda

AU - Mohamed Shah, Noraida

AU - Makmor Bakry, Mohd

PY - 2015/5/13

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N2 - Background: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline information on the current level of knowledge about, attitude toward, and experience with antibiotic usage, and prefer­ences for shared decision making among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey, involving 1,105 respondents who were aged between 13 and 17 years and who lived in Malaysia, was conducted using a validated questionnaire. The survey assessed knowledge, attitude, and experience with regard to antibiotic usage, and adolescents’ preferences for the style of shared decision-making process. Results: The majority (n=786 [71.13%]) of the respondents had a low level of knowledge, 296 (26.79%) had a moderate level of knowledge, and 23 (2.08%) had a high level of knowledge. Further, they demonstrated a slightly negative attitude mean score of 3.30±0.05 (range: 0–8 points) but a positive experience mean score of 2.90±0.029 (range: 0–4 points). There was a positive correlation between knowledge and attitude scores, with a higher knowledge level associated with a more positive attitude toward antibiotic usage (r=0.257, P0.001). Higher knowledge scores were associated with a more negative experience with antibiotic usage (r=-0.83, P=0.006). When assessing preference in shared decision making, more adolescents preferred an active role (n=408 [37%]) compared with collaborative (n=360 [32.6%]) or pas­sive (n=337 [30.5%]) (P=0.028) roles. Conclusion: Current health care settings should involve adolescents in the decision-making process. Education packages can be introduced to improve adolescents’ knowledge of and practice of taking antibiotics, as well as to encourage their participation in decision making, in an attempt to reduce misuse of antibiotics.

AB - Background: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline information on the current level of knowledge about, attitude toward, and experience with antibiotic usage, and prefer­ences for shared decision making among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional survey, involving 1,105 respondents who were aged between 13 and 17 years and who lived in Malaysia, was conducted using a validated questionnaire. The survey assessed knowledge, attitude, and experience with regard to antibiotic usage, and adolescents’ preferences for the style of shared decision-making process. Results: The majority (n=786 [71.13%]) of the respondents had a low level of knowledge, 296 (26.79%) had a moderate level of knowledge, and 23 (2.08%) had a high level of knowledge. Further, they demonstrated a slightly negative attitude mean score of 3.30±0.05 (range: 0–8 points) but a positive experience mean score of 2.90±0.029 (range: 0–4 points). There was a positive correlation between knowledge and attitude scores, with a higher knowledge level associated with a more positive attitude toward antibiotic usage (r=0.257, P0.001). Higher knowledge scores were associated with a more negative experience with antibiotic usage (r=-0.83, P=0.006). When assessing preference in shared decision making, more adolescents preferred an active role (n=408 [37%]) compared with collaborative (n=360 [32.6%]) or pas­sive (n=337 [30.5%]) (P=0.028) roles. Conclusion: Current health care settings should involve adolescents in the decision-making process. Education packages can be introduced to improve adolescents’ knowledge of and practice of taking antibiotics, as well as to encourage their participation in decision making, in an attempt to reduce misuse of antibiotics.

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