Antibiogram for haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections

Abdul Halim Abdul Gafor, Pau Cheong Ping, Anis Farahanum Zainal Abidin, Muhammad Zulhilmie Saruddin, Ng Kah Yan, Siti Qania Ah Adam, Ramliza Ramli, Anita Sulong, Petrick @ Ramesh K Periyasamy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Haemodialysis (HD) catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are a major complication of long-term catheter use in HD. This study identified the epidemiology of HD CRBSIs and to aid in the choice of empiric antibiotics therapy given to patients with HD CRBSIs. Methods. Patients with HD CRBSIs were identified. Their blood cultures were performed according to standard sterile technique. Specimens were sent to the microbiology lab for culture and sensitivity testing. Results were tabulated in antibiograms. Results. 18 patients with a median age of 61.0 years (IQR: 51.5-73.25) were confirmed to have HD CRBSIs based on our study criteria. Eight (44.4%) patients had gram-negative infections, 7 (38.9%) patients gram-positive infections, and 3 (16.7%) patients had polymicrobial infections. We noted that most of the gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to ceftazidime. Unfortunately, cloxacillin resistance was high among gram-positive organisms. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Bacillus sp. were the most common gram-positive organisms and they were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Our study revealed the increased incidence of gram-negative organism in HD CRBSIs. Antibiogram is an important tool in deciding empirical antibiotics for HD CRBSIs. Tailoring your antibiotics accordingly to the antibiogram can increase the chance of successful treatment and prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number629459
JournalInternational Journal of Nephrology
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Catheter-Related Infections
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Renal Dialysis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Cloxacillin
Ceftazidime
Coagulase
Vancomycin
Microbiology
Infection
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Coinfection
Staphylococcus
Bacillus
Epidemiology
Catheters
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Antibiogram for haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections. / Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim; Ping, Pau Cheong; Abidin, Anis Farahanum Zainal; Saruddin, Muhammad Zulhilmie; Yan, Ng Kah; Adam, Siti Qania Ah; Ramli, Ramliza; Sulong, Anita; K Periyasamy, Petrick @ Ramesh.

In: International Journal of Nephrology, Vol. 2014, 629459, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim ; Ping, Pau Cheong ; Abidin, Anis Farahanum Zainal ; Saruddin, Muhammad Zulhilmie ; Yan, Ng Kah ; Adam, Siti Qania Ah ; Ramli, Ramliza ; Sulong, Anita ; K Periyasamy, Petrick @ Ramesh. / Antibiogram for haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections. In: International Journal of Nephrology. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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