Anti-halal and anti-animal slaughtering campaigns and their impact in post-war Sri Lanka

Mohammad Agus Yusoff, Athambawa Sarjoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper aims to examine the overall impact of anti-halal and anti-slaughtering campaigns in the context of post-war Sri Lanka. The reemergence of majoritarian ethno-religious anti-minority nationalist forces and their intensified anti-minority hatred and violence have made it challenging for ethno-religious minorities in Sri Lanka to engage in religious norms and duties. This is especially true for the Muslim community. Numerous Islamic fundamentals have been criticized and opposed. Muslims have had to endure threats and acts of violence. These campaigns and violent oppositions, imposed by the Buddhist-nationalist forces, have caused concern for Muslims performing their obligatory religious duties and norms. In Sri Lanka, the Muslim community has been allowed to produce halal food and slaughter animals for human consumption and religious rituals for a long period without disturbance. Unfortunately, retaliation and hatred in the post-civil war era in the country have threatened these rights. Thus, it has become imperative to investigate the motivating factors of the anti-halal and anti-animal slaughtering campaigns and violence, as well as their related impact, which is lacking in the existing literature on ethno-religious politics in the context of Sri Lanka. This study found that the anti-halal and anti-animal slaughtering campaigns and oppositions that have been intensified by the Buddhist nationalist forces were part of anti-Muslim sentiments intended to sabotage the economic pride of Muslims and undermine their religious renaissance. The study also found that these campaigns have been facilitated by the state and that continuous facilitation of the anti-Muslim sentiments and campaigns, including the anti-halal and anti-animal slaughter campaigns, would challenge the country’s economic prosperity and the rebuilding of ethno-religious harmony.

Original languageEnglish
Article number46
JournalReligions
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Animals
Sri Lanka
Religion
Muslims
Nationalists
Hatred
Sentiment
Economics
Buddhist
Muslim Community
Minorities
Fundamental
Religious Rituals
Sabotage
Harmony
Prosperity
Pride
Threat
Civil War
Rebuilding

Keywords

  • Animal slaughtering
  • Anti-halal campaigns
  • Buddhist nationalism
  • Muslims
  • Post-war Sri Lanka

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies

Cite this

Anti-halal and anti-animal slaughtering campaigns and their impact in post-war Sri Lanka. / Yusoff, Mohammad Agus; Sarjoon, Athambawa.

In: Religions, Vol. 8, No. 4, 46, 01.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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