Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions: A 2-year large single institution experience

Chew R. Ming, Andrea Ban Yu-Lin, Mohammad F. Abdul Hamid, Mohd Talib Latif, Nurashikin Mohammad, Hassan Tidi Maharani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective: The Southeast Asia (SEA) haze is an annual problem and at its worst could produce respirable particles of concentrations up to 500 μg/m3 which is five times the level considered as ‘unhealthy’. However, there are limited reports examining the direct clinical impact of the annual haze. This study examines the effects of the SEA haze on respiratory admissions. Methods: Data from all respiratory admissions in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from 1st January 2014 to 31st December 2015 were collected retrospectively from chart and electronic database. A total of 16 weeks of haze period had been formally dated by the Department of Environment using the definition of weather phenomenon leading to atmospheric visibility of less than 10 km. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to estimate rate ratios and 95% CI. Results: There were 1968 subjects admitted for respiratory admissions in UKMMC during the study period. Incidence rates per week were significantly different between the two groups with 27.6 ± 9.2 cases per week during the haze versus 15.7 ± 6.7 cases per week during the non-haze period (P < 0.01). A total of 4% versus 2% was admitted to the intensive care unit in the haze and the non-haze groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The mean ± SD lengths of stay was 12.1 ± 5.2 days; the haze group had a longer stay (18.2 ± 9.7 days) compared to the non-haze groups (9.7 ± 3.9) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The annual SEA haze is associated with increased respiratory admissions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)914-920
Number of pages7
JournalRespirology
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Southeastern Asia
varespladib methyl
Malaysia
Weather
Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Regression Analysis
Databases
Incidence

Keywords

  • air pollution
  • haze, respiratory admissions, Southeast Asia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Ming, C. R., Ban Yu-Lin, A., Abdul Hamid, M. F., Latif, M. T., Mohammad, N., & Tidi Maharani, H. (2018). Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions: A 2-year large single institution experience. Respirology, 23(10), 914-920. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13325

Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions : A 2-year large single institution experience. / Ming, Chew R.; Ban Yu-Lin, Andrea; Abdul Hamid, Mohammad F.; Latif, Mohd Talib; Mohammad, Nurashikin; Tidi Maharani, Hassan.

In: Respirology, Vol. 23, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 914-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ming, CR, Ban Yu-Lin, A, Abdul Hamid, MF, Latif, MT, Mohammad, N & Tidi Maharani, H 2018, 'Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions: A 2-year large single institution experience', Respirology, vol. 23, no. 10, pp. 914-920. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.13325
Ming, Chew R. ; Ban Yu-Lin, Andrea ; Abdul Hamid, Mohammad F. ; Latif, Mohd Talib ; Mohammad, Nurashikin ; Tidi Maharani, Hassan. / Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions : A 2-year large single institution experience. In: Respirology. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 10. pp. 914-920.
@article{5fd61e38d8f244c08f434bbcfdd49cc5,
title = "Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions: A 2-year large single institution experience",
abstract = "Background and objective: The Southeast Asia (SEA) haze is an annual problem and at its worst could produce respirable particles of concentrations up to 500 μg/m3 which is five times the level considered as ‘unhealthy’. However, there are limited reports examining the direct clinical impact of the annual haze. This study examines the effects of the SEA haze on respiratory admissions. Methods: Data from all respiratory admissions in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from 1st January 2014 to 31st December 2015 were collected retrospectively from chart and electronic database. A total of 16 weeks of haze period had been formally dated by the Department of Environment using the definition of weather phenomenon leading to atmospheric visibility of less than 10 km. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to estimate rate ratios and 95{\%} CI. Results: There were 1968 subjects admitted for respiratory admissions in UKMMC during the study period. Incidence rates per week were significantly different between the two groups with 27.6 ± 9.2 cases per week during the haze versus 15.7 ± 6.7 cases per week during the non-haze period (P < 0.01). A total of 4{\%} versus 2{\%} was admitted to the intensive care unit in the haze and the non-haze groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The mean ± SD lengths of stay was 12.1 ± 5.2 days; the haze group had a longer stay (18.2 ± 9.7 days) compared to the non-haze groups (9.7 ± 3.9) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The annual SEA haze is associated with increased respiratory admissions.",
keywords = "air pollution, haze, respiratory admissions, Southeast Asia",
author = "Ming, {Chew R.} and {Ban Yu-Lin}, Andrea and {Abdul Hamid}, {Mohammad F.} and Latif, {Mohd Talib} and Nurashikin Mohammad and {Tidi Maharani}, Hassan",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/resp.13325",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "914--920",
journal = "Respirology",
issn = "1323-7799",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Annual Southeast Asia haze increases respiratory admissions

T2 - A 2-year large single institution experience

AU - Ming, Chew R.

AU - Ban Yu-Lin, Andrea

AU - Abdul Hamid, Mohammad F.

AU - Latif, Mohd Talib

AU - Mohammad, Nurashikin

AU - Tidi Maharani, Hassan

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Background and objective: The Southeast Asia (SEA) haze is an annual problem and at its worst could produce respirable particles of concentrations up to 500 μg/m3 which is five times the level considered as ‘unhealthy’. However, there are limited reports examining the direct clinical impact of the annual haze. This study examines the effects of the SEA haze on respiratory admissions. Methods: Data from all respiratory admissions in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from 1st January 2014 to 31st December 2015 were collected retrospectively from chart and electronic database. A total of 16 weeks of haze period had been formally dated by the Department of Environment using the definition of weather phenomenon leading to atmospheric visibility of less than 10 km. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to estimate rate ratios and 95% CI. Results: There were 1968 subjects admitted for respiratory admissions in UKMMC during the study period. Incidence rates per week were significantly different between the two groups with 27.6 ± 9.2 cases per week during the haze versus 15.7 ± 6.7 cases per week during the non-haze period (P < 0.01). A total of 4% versus 2% was admitted to the intensive care unit in the haze and the non-haze groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The mean ± SD lengths of stay was 12.1 ± 5.2 days; the haze group had a longer stay (18.2 ± 9.7 days) compared to the non-haze groups (9.7 ± 3.9) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The annual SEA haze is associated with increased respiratory admissions.

AB - Background and objective: The Southeast Asia (SEA) haze is an annual problem and at its worst could produce respirable particles of concentrations up to 500 μg/m3 which is five times the level considered as ‘unhealthy’. However, there are limited reports examining the direct clinical impact of the annual haze. This study examines the effects of the SEA haze on respiratory admissions. Methods: Data from all respiratory admissions in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from 1st January 2014 to 31st December 2015 were collected retrospectively from chart and electronic database. A total of 16 weeks of haze period had been formally dated by the Department of Environment using the definition of weather phenomenon leading to atmospheric visibility of less than 10 km. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to estimate rate ratios and 95% CI. Results: There were 1968 subjects admitted for respiratory admissions in UKMMC during the study period. Incidence rates per week were significantly different between the two groups with 27.6 ± 9.2 cases per week during the haze versus 15.7 ± 6.7 cases per week during the non-haze period (P < 0.01). A total of 4% versus 2% was admitted to the intensive care unit in the haze and the non-haze groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The mean ± SD lengths of stay was 12.1 ± 5.2 days; the haze group had a longer stay (18.2 ± 9.7 days) compared to the non-haze groups (9.7 ± 3.9) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The annual SEA haze is associated with increased respiratory admissions.

KW - air pollution

KW - haze, respiratory admissions, Southeast Asia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053557487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053557487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/resp.13325

DO - 10.1111/resp.13325

M3 - Article

C2 - 29923364

AN - SCOPUS:85053557487

VL - 23

SP - 914

EP - 920

JO - Respirology

JF - Respirology

SN - 1323-7799

IS - 10

ER -