Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG)

Hasiah Mohamed, Azizah Jaafar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Playability Heuristic Evaluation for Educational Computer Games (PHEG) has been developed to evaluate educational computer games during the iterative process. There are five heuristics involved; interface, educational elements, content, playability and multimedia. Involvement of expert evaluators shows promising result in identifying usability problems of educational computer games. The problems found need to be rated based on the severity scale provided. In order to analyze the critical problems found, a new analysis approach was introduced. A function to calculate the critical usability problems and the presentation of the result in percentage appears to be valuable for developers to grasp the problems that occur with educational computer games that are still in the development process. Result shows the most critical problems found was from Educational Elements heuristics and the percentage value was 85.71%. The least critical problems found were in Playability heuristic and the value was 45.45%. Mean value (68.43%) of the overall analysis can be used as an indicator for overall critical usability problems found in educational computer games.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012
Pages162-168
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event7th IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012 - Baltimore, MD
Duration: 14 May 201216 May 2012

Other

Other7th IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012
CityBaltimore, MD
Period14/5/1216/5/12

Fingerprint

Computer games

Keywords

  • Critical usability problems
  • Interface
  • Multimedia
  • Playability
  • Usability of educational computer game

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Mohamed, H., & Jaafar, A. (2012). Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG). In Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012 (pp. 162-168) https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2012.772-038

Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG). / Mohamed, Hasiah; Jaafar, Azizah.

Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012. 2012. p. 162-168.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mohamed, H & Jaafar, A 2012, Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG). in Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012. pp. 162-168, 7th IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012, Baltimore, MD, 14/5/12. https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2012.772-038
Mohamed H, Jaafar A. Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG). In Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012. 2012. p. 162-168 https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2012.772-038
Mohamed, Hasiah ; Jaafar, Azizah. / Analyzing critical usability problems in educational computer game (UsaECG). Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI 2012. 2012. pp. 162-168
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