Anaerobic degradation of adsorbable organic halides (AOX) from pulp and paper industry wastewater

D. V. Savant, R. Abdul-Rahman, D. R. Ranade

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    129 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Adsorbable organic halides (AOX) are generated in the pulp and paper industry during the bleaching process. These compounds are formed as a result of reaction between residual lignin from wood fibres and chlorine/chlorine compounds used for bleaching. Many of these compounds are recalcitrant and have long half-life periods. Some of them show a tendency to bioaccumulate while some are proven carcinogens and mutagens. Hence, it is necessary to remove or degrade these compounds from wastewater. Physical, chemical and electrochemical methods reported to remove AOX compounds are not economically viable. Different types of aerobic, anaerobic and combined biological treatment processes have been developed for treatment of pulp and paper industry wastewater. Maximum dechlorination is found to occur under anaerobic conditions. However, as these processes are designed specifically for reducing COD and BOD of wastewater, they do not ensure complete removal of AOX. This paper reviews the anaerobic biological treatments developed for pulp and paper industry wastewater and also reviews the specific micro-organisms reported to degrade AOX compounds under anaerobic conditions, their nutritional and biochemical requirements. It is imperative to consider these specific micro-organisms while designing an anaerobic treatment for efficient removal of AOX.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1092-1104
    Number of pages13
    JournalBioresource Technology
    Volume97
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

    Fingerprint

    halides
    pulp and paper industry
    Paper and pulp industry
    halide
    Waste Water
    wastewater
    Industry
    Wastewater
    Degradation
    biological treatment
    degradation
    Bleaching
    chlorine
    bleaching
    anaerobic conditions
    anoxic conditions
    Chlorine Compounds
    Mutagens
    dechlorination
    microorganisms

    Keywords

    • Adsorbable organic halides
    • Anaerobic degradation
    • Organochlorine degradation
    • Pulp and paper industry
    • Wastewater treatment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agronomy and Crop Science
    • Food Science
    • Process Chemistry and Technology
    • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

    Cite this

    Anaerobic degradation of adsorbable organic halides (AOX) from pulp and paper industry wastewater. / Savant, D. V.; Abdul-Rahman, R.; Ranade, D. R.

    In: Bioresource Technology, Vol. 97, No. 9, 06.2006, p. 1092-1104.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Savant, D. V. ; Abdul-Rahman, R. ; Ranade, D. R. / Anaerobic degradation of adsorbable organic halides (AOX) from pulp and paper industry wastewater. In: Bioresource Technology. 2006 ; Vol. 97, No. 9. pp. 1092-1104.
    @article{7edc4b7bc48c4d30b2c088662260592e,
    title = "Anaerobic degradation of adsorbable organic halides (AOX) from pulp and paper industry wastewater",
    abstract = "Adsorbable organic halides (AOX) are generated in the pulp and paper industry during the bleaching process. These compounds are formed as a result of reaction between residual lignin from wood fibres and chlorine/chlorine compounds used for bleaching. Many of these compounds are recalcitrant and have long half-life periods. Some of them show a tendency to bioaccumulate while some are proven carcinogens and mutagens. Hence, it is necessary to remove or degrade these compounds from wastewater. Physical, chemical and electrochemical methods reported to remove AOX compounds are not economically viable. Different types of aerobic, anaerobic and combined biological treatment processes have been developed for treatment of pulp and paper industry wastewater. Maximum dechlorination is found to occur under anaerobic conditions. However, as these processes are designed specifically for reducing COD and BOD of wastewater, they do not ensure complete removal of AOX. This paper reviews the anaerobic biological treatments developed for pulp and paper industry wastewater and also reviews the specific micro-organisms reported to degrade AOX compounds under anaerobic conditions, their nutritional and biochemical requirements. It is imperative to consider these specific micro-organisms while designing an anaerobic treatment for efficient removal of AOX.",
    keywords = "Adsorbable organic halides, Anaerobic degradation, Organochlorine degradation, Pulp and paper industry, Wastewater treatment",
    author = "Savant, {D. V.} and R. Abdul-Rahman and Ranade, {D. R.}",
    year = "2006",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.1016/j.biortech.2004.12.013",
    language = "English",
    volume = "97",
    pages = "1092--1104",
    journal = "Bioresource Technology",
    issn = "0960-8524",
    publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
    number = "9",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Anaerobic degradation of adsorbable organic halides (AOX) from pulp and paper industry wastewater

    AU - Savant, D. V.

    AU - Abdul-Rahman, R.

    AU - Ranade, D. R.

    PY - 2006/6

    Y1 - 2006/6

    N2 - Adsorbable organic halides (AOX) are generated in the pulp and paper industry during the bleaching process. These compounds are formed as a result of reaction between residual lignin from wood fibres and chlorine/chlorine compounds used for bleaching. Many of these compounds are recalcitrant and have long half-life periods. Some of them show a tendency to bioaccumulate while some are proven carcinogens and mutagens. Hence, it is necessary to remove or degrade these compounds from wastewater. Physical, chemical and electrochemical methods reported to remove AOX compounds are not economically viable. Different types of aerobic, anaerobic and combined biological treatment processes have been developed for treatment of pulp and paper industry wastewater. Maximum dechlorination is found to occur under anaerobic conditions. However, as these processes are designed specifically for reducing COD and BOD of wastewater, they do not ensure complete removal of AOX. This paper reviews the anaerobic biological treatments developed for pulp and paper industry wastewater and also reviews the specific micro-organisms reported to degrade AOX compounds under anaerobic conditions, their nutritional and biochemical requirements. It is imperative to consider these specific micro-organisms while designing an anaerobic treatment for efficient removal of AOX.

    AB - Adsorbable organic halides (AOX) are generated in the pulp and paper industry during the bleaching process. These compounds are formed as a result of reaction between residual lignin from wood fibres and chlorine/chlorine compounds used for bleaching. Many of these compounds are recalcitrant and have long half-life periods. Some of them show a tendency to bioaccumulate while some are proven carcinogens and mutagens. Hence, it is necessary to remove or degrade these compounds from wastewater. Physical, chemical and electrochemical methods reported to remove AOX compounds are not economically viable. Different types of aerobic, anaerobic and combined biological treatment processes have been developed for treatment of pulp and paper industry wastewater. Maximum dechlorination is found to occur under anaerobic conditions. However, as these processes are designed specifically for reducing COD and BOD of wastewater, they do not ensure complete removal of AOX. This paper reviews the anaerobic biological treatments developed for pulp and paper industry wastewater and also reviews the specific micro-organisms reported to degrade AOX compounds under anaerobic conditions, their nutritional and biochemical requirements. It is imperative to consider these specific micro-organisms while designing an anaerobic treatment for efficient removal of AOX.

    KW - Adsorbable organic halides

    KW - Anaerobic degradation

    KW - Organochlorine degradation

    KW - Pulp and paper industry

    KW - Wastewater treatment

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645025408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645025408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.biortech.2004.12.013

    DO - 10.1016/j.biortech.2004.12.013

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 16551531

    AN - SCOPUS:33645025408

    VL - 97

    SP - 1092

    EP - 1104

    JO - Bioresource Technology

    JF - Bioresource Technology

    SN - 0960-8524

    IS - 9

    ER -