An evaluation of outdoor and building environment cooling achieved through combination modification of trees with ground materials

Mohd Fairuz Shahidan, Phillip J. Jones, Julie Gwilliam, Elias @ Ilias Salleh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study focuses on the optimum cooling effect of trees with ground materials modification in mitigating the urban heat island (UHI) and the benefits towards building energy performance in tropical climate. The modification focused on both physical properties - i.e. tree canopy density and quantity; and the albedo values of ground materials. Two phases of methodology were developed and applied using field measurement and computer simulation. This study measured the average monthly UHI intensity found to be +2.6 °C. In mitigating its impact, higher levels of tree canopy density (LAI 9.7) coupled with "cool" materials (albedo of 0.8) produced the largest urban air temperature reduction. Simulations predicted an average air temperature reduction of 2.7 °C when compared with the current condition. Further, both modifications were found to produce a potential building cooling load reduction of up to 29%. In fact, the optimum improvement of both outdoor and indoor environment was influenced by three major physical factors, namely, larger tree quantity, higher canopy density and cool materials. Thus, it is suggested that appropriate guidelines, influencing implementation of these improvements could be implemented in order to mitigate the UHI effect in tropical climate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-257
Number of pages13
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

heat island
Cooling
cooling
heat
canopy
evaluation
albedo
air temperature
air
climate
Air
computer simulation
leaf area index
Thermal effects
building
Physical properties
physical property
energy
Temperature
simulation

Keywords

  • Building energy savings
  • Cool pavement
  • Optimum cooling effect
  • Outdoor and indoor air temperature
  • Tree canopy density and quantity
  • Urban heat island mitigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

An evaluation of outdoor and building environment cooling achieved through combination modification of trees with ground materials. / Shahidan, Mohd Fairuz; Jones, Phillip J.; Gwilliam, Julie; Salleh, Elias @ Ilias.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 58, 12.2012, p. 245-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shahidan, Mohd Fairuz ; Jones, Phillip J. ; Gwilliam, Julie ; Salleh, Elias @ Ilias. / An evaluation of outdoor and building environment cooling achieved through combination modification of trees with ground materials. In: Building and Environment. 2012 ; Vol. 58. pp. 245-257.
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