An assessment of the prescribing skills of undergraduate dental students in malaysia

Ashfaq Akram, Ruzanna Zamzam, Nabishah Mohamad, Dalia Abdullah, Subhan M. Meerah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most dental schools lack a module on prescription writing in pharmacology. This study assessed the prescription writing skills of a group of Malaysian dental students at the end of their undergraduate training program. A quantitative study of a two-group posttest experiment was designed, and thirty-seven fifth-year (final-year) dental students were divided into two groups (A [n=18] and B [n=19]). Group A received a didactic lecture on how to write a complete prescription, while Group B served as a control group. For prescription writing, three standardized dental scenarios with a diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis associated with a child and a pregnant woman and periapical pulpitis for an adult man were administered. Thus, a total of 111 prescriptions (Group A [n=54] and Group B [n=57]) were collected. Twelve elements in each prescription were assessed by frequency and a chi-square test. Improvements in eight out of the twelve elements were observed in prescriptions written by students in Group A. The significantly improved elements were provision of the symbol Rx (39.8 percent) (p<0.001), inclusion of the prescriber's signature (75.3 percent) (p<0.001), inclusion of the date with the prescriber's signature (54.6 percent) (p<0.001), and inclusion of the prescriber's registration (30.5 percent) (p<0.001). Overall, Group A gained almost a 50 percent improvement in writing complete prescriptions due to the intervening lecture. It appeared a traditional lecture led to the more accurate writing of a complete prescription. It was suggested that a module on prescription writing be added to the school's pharmacology curriculum, so that dental graduates will be competent in prescription writing for the sake of their patients' health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1527-1531
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume76
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2012

Fingerprint

Dental Students
Malaysia
Prescriptions
medication
student
Group
Pulpitis
pharmacology
inclusion
Tooth
Pharmacology
Dental Schools
Chi-Square Distribution
didactics
Curriculum
school
training program
Pregnant Women
symbol
graduate

Keywords

  • Clinical education
  • Dental education
  • Educational methodology
  • Malaysia
  • Prescribing error
  • Prescription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Education

Cite this

An assessment of the prescribing skills of undergraduate dental students in malaysia. / Akram, Ashfaq; Zamzam, Ruzanna; Mohamad, Nabishah; Abdullah, Dalia; Meerah, Subhan M.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 76, No. 11, 01.11.2012, p. 1527-1531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Akram, Ashfaq ; Zamzam, Ruzanna ; Mohamad, Nabishah ; Abdullah, Dalia ; Meerah, Subhan M. / An assessment of the prescribing skills of undergraduate dental students in malaysia. In: Journal of Dental Education. 2012 ; Vol. 76, No. 11. pp. 1527-1531.
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