Amputation and non-functioning limb salvage: Cultural stigma of limb loss

Adi Syazni Muhammed, Ramesh Kumar Athi Kumar, Abdul Halim Abdul Rahim, Farrah Hani Imran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Amputation is usually the last resort for treatment of non-salvageable limbs due to various indications such as trauma, infection and malignancy. However, some patients still refuse surgery and reconstruction. Instead, they insist on keeping their limbs despite knowing the negative consequences including a limited or non-functioning limb. We present three cases who refused amputations: The first was a nine-year-old boy involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA), with a left femoral midshaft open grade IIIb fracture; the mangled extremity severity score (MESS) was five. The second was a 16-year-old girl sustained a left leg crush injury, a fractured left fibula and an injury to the anterior tibial artery following an MVA; her MESS was 12. The third was a 60-year-old left-handed tractor driver presented with a five-year history of a slowly enlarging fungating growth over the dorsum of his left hand; biopsy confirmed basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We explore the cultural and religious reasons behind this stigma of amputation in a multiethnic community. It will help clinicians to manage these challenging situations according to the principles of medical ethics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-119
Number of pages4
JournalBahrain Medical Bulletin
Volume39
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Limb Salvage
Amputation
Extremities
Motor Vehicles
Accidents
Leg Injuries
Tibial Arteries
Medical Ethics
Fibula
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Wounds and Injuries
Thigh
Hand
Biopsy
Growth
Infection
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Amputation and non-functioning limb salvage : Cultural stigma of limb loss. / Muhammed, Adi Syazni; Athi Kumar, Ramesh Kumar; Rahim, Abdul Halim Abdul; Imran, Farrah Hani.

In: Bahrain Medical Bulletin, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2017, p. 116-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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