Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures

J. Y. Richard Liew, N. M. Punniyakotty, N. E. Shanmugam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern limit-state design codes are based on limits of structural resistance. To determine the 'true' ultimate load-carrying capacity of spatial structures, an advanced analysis method which considers the interaction of actual behaviour of individual members with that of the structure is required. In the present work, a large-displacement inelastic analysis technique has been adopted to compute the maximum strength of spatial structures considering both member and structure instability. The actual behaviour of individual members in a spatial structure is depicted in the form of an inelastic strut model considering member initial imperfections as 'enlarged' out-of-straightness. The maximum strength of the strut is computed based on a member with 'equivalent out-of-straightness' so as to achieve the specification's strength for an axially loaded column. The results obtained by the strut model are shown to agree well with those determined using plastic-zone analysis. The nonlinear equilibrium equations resulting from geometrical and material nonlinearities are solved using an incremental-iterative numerical scheme based on generalised displacement control method. The effectiveness of the proposed advanced analysis over the conventional analysis/design approach is demonstrated by application to several space truss problems. The design implications associated with the use of the advanced analysis are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-48
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Constructional Steel Research
Volume42
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Struts
Displacement control
Load limits
Plastics
Specifications
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Richard Liew, J. Y., Punniyakotty, N. M., & Shanmugam, N. E. (1997). Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures. Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 42(1), 21-48.

Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures. / Richard Liew, J. Y.; Punniyakotty, N. M.; Shanmugam, N. E.

In: Journal of Constructional Steel Research, Vol. 42, No. 1, 04.1997, p. 21-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richard Liew, JY, Punniyakotty, NM & Shanmugam, NE 1997, 'Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures', Journal of Constructional Steel Research, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 21-48.
Richard Liew JY, Punniyakotty NM, Shanmugam NE. Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures. Journal of Constructional Steel Research. 1997 Apr;42(1):21-48.
Richard Liew, J. Y. ; Punniyakotty, N. M. ; Shanmugam, N. E. / Advanced analysis and design of spatial structures. In: Journal of Constructional Steel Research. 1997 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 21-48.
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