Advanced abdominal pregnancy resulting from late uterine rupture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Advanced abdominal pregnancy is rare, and one that occurs after uterine rupture with delivery of a viable fetus is exceptional. CASE: A multiparous patient was admitted at 29 weeks of gestation for conservative management of placenta previa. She complained of intermittent abdominal pain, but repeated assessment suggested that both the patient and the fetus were doing well. At 36 weeks, an abdominal pregnancy was diagnosed with radiological features suggestive of uterine rupture. Laparotomy was performed and a healthy infant was delivered. CONCLUSION: Fetal viability was achieved in this case of abdominal pregnancy secondary to uterine rupture after close maternal and fetal surveillance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502-504
Number of pages3
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume111
Issue number2 PART 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

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Abdominal Pregnancy
Uterine Rupture
Fetus
Fetal Viability
Placenta Previa
Pain Measurement
Laparotomy
Abdominal Pain
Mothers
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Advanced abdominal pregnancy resulting from late uterine rupture. / Naim, Norzilawati M.; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Siraj @ Ramli, Harlina Halizah; Ng, Paul; Abdullah Mahdy, Zaleha; Mohd. Razi, Zainul Rashid.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 111, No. 2 PART 2, 02.2008, p. 502-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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