Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia: Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models

A. Azwandi, H. Nina Keterina, L. C. Owen, M. D. Nurizzati, Baharudin Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decomposing carrion provides a temporary microhabitat and food source for a distinct community of organisms. Arthropods constitute a major part of this community and can be utilized to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI) of cadavers during criminal investigations. However, in Malaysia, knowledge of carrion arthropod assemblages and their succession is superficial. Therefore, a study on three types of forensic entomology animal model was conducted from 27 September 2010 to 28 October 2010 in a tropical rainforest at National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Over one month collections of arthropods were made on nine animal carcasses: three laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus, mean weight: 0.508 ± 0.027kg), three rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, mean weight: 2.538 ± 0.109kg) and three long tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis, mean weight: 5.750 ± 0.551kg). A total of 31 433 arthropods belonging to eight orders and twenty-eight families were collected from all carcasses. Among 2 924 of adults flies collected, approximately 19% were calliphorids with Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) being the most abundant. Arthropod taxon richness was lower on rat carcasses compared to that of rabbit and monkey carcasses, and this was more apparent during the first week of decomposition. However, there were no significant differences in Shannon-Weiner index (H'), Simpson dominance index (C) and Pielou's Evenness index (J) between different animal model. The arthropod assemblages associated to animal model were different significantly (p<0.05) while decomposition stage was a significant factor influencing insect assemblages (p<0.05). Analysis on the arthropods succession indicated that some taxa have a clear visitation period while the others, particularly Coleoptera, did not show a clear successional pattern thus require futher insect succession study. Although human bodies were not possible for the succession study, most of the arthropods collected are necrophagous, and will also possibly colonize human cadaver, and potentially be useful in assisting in estimates of PMI in future forensic cases in Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-494
Number of pages14
JournalTropical Biomedicine
Volume30
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Entomology
Arthropods
Malaysia
Animal Models
Rabbits
Cadaver
Weights and Measures
Insects
Macaca fascicularis
Rainforest
Beetles
Macaca
Human Body
Diptera
Haplorhini
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Azwandi, A., Nina Keterina, H., Owen, L. C., Nurizzati, M. D., & Omar, B. (2013). Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia: Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models. Tropical Biomedicine, 30(3), 481-494.

Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia : Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models. / Azwandi, A.; Nina Keterina, H.; Owen, L. C.; Nurizzati, M. D.; Omar, Baharudin.

In: Tropical Biomedicine, Vol. 30, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 481-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Azwandi, A, Nina Keterina, H, Owen, LC, Nurizzati, MD & Omar, B 2013, 'Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia: Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models', Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 481-494.
Azwandi, A. ; Nina Keterina, H. ; Owen, L. C. ; Nurizzati, M. D. ; Omar, Baharudin. / Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia : Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models. In: Tropical Biomedicine. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 481-494.
@article{0f77b7ceca4045229f045699c364a288,
title = "Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia: Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models",
abstract = "Decomposing carrion provides a temporary microhabitat and food source for a distinct community of organisms. Arthropods constitute a major part of this community and can be utilized to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI) of cadavers during criminal investigations. However, in Malaysia, knowledge of carrion arthropod assemblages and their succession is superficial. Therefore, a study on three types of forensic entomology animal model was conducted from 27 September 2010 to 28 October 2010 in a tropical rainforest at National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Over one month collections of arthropods were made on nine animal carcasses: three laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus, mean weight: 0.508 ± 0.027kg), three rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, mean weight: 2.538 ± 0.109kg) and three long tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis, mean weight: 5.750 ± 0.551kg). A total of 31 433 arthropods belonging to eight orders and twenty-eight families were collected from all carcasses. Among 2 924 of adults flies collected, approximately 19{\%} were calliphorids with Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) being the most abundant. Arthropod taxon richness was lower on rat carcasses compared to that of rabbit and monkey carcasses, and this was more apparent during the first week of decomposition. However, there were no significant differences in Shannon-Weiner index (H'), Simpson dominance index (C) and Pielou's Evenness index (J) between different animal model. The arthropod assemblages associated to animal model were different significantly (p<0.05) while decomposition stage was a significant factor influencing insect assemblages (p<0.05). Analysis on the arthropods succession indicated that some taxa have a clear visitation period while the others, particularly Coleoptera, did not show a clear successional pattern thus require futher insect succession study. Although human bodies were not possible for the succession study, most of the arthropods collected are necrophagous, and will also possibly colonize human cadaver, and potentially be useful in assisting in estimates of PMI in future forensic cases in Malaysia.",
author = "A. Azwandi and {Nina Keterina}, H. and Owen, {L. C.} and Nurizzati, {M. D.} and Baharudin Omar",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "481--494",
journal = "Tropical Biomedicine",
issn = "0127-5720",
publisher = "Malaysian Society of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adult carrion arthropod community in a tropical rainforest of Malaysia

T2 - Analysis on three common forensic entomology animal models

AU - Azwandi, A.

AU - Nina Keterina, H.

AU - Owen, L. C.

AU - Nurizzati, M. D.

AU - Omar, Baharudin

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - Decomposing carrion provides a temporary microhabitat and food source for a distinct community of organisms. Arthropods constitute a major part of this community and can be utilized to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI) of cadavers during criminal investigations. However, in Malaysia, knowledge of carrion arthropod assemblages and their succession is superficial. Therefore, a study on three types of forensic entomology animal model was conducted from 27 September 2010 to 28 October 2010 in a tropical rainforest at National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Over one month collections of arthropods were made on nine animal carcasses: three laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus, mean weight: 0.508 ± 0.027kg), three rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, mean weight: 2.538 ± 0.109kg) and three long tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis, mean weight: 5.750 ± 0.551kg). A total of 31 433 arthropods belonging to eight orders and twenty-eight families were collected from all carcasses. Among 2 924 of adults flies collected, approximately 19% were calliphorids with Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) being the most abundant. Arthropod taxon richness was lower on rat carcasses compared to that of rabbit and monkey carcasses, and this was more apparent during the first week of decomposition. However, there were no significant differences in Shannon-Weiner index (H'), Simpson dominance index (C) and Pielou's Evenness index (J) between different animal model. The arthropod assemblages associated to animal model were different significantly (p<0.05) while decomposition stage was a significant factor influencing insect assemblages (p<0.05). Analysis on the arthropods succession indicated that some taxa have a clear visitation period while the others, particularly Coleoptera, did not show a clear successional pattern thus require futher insect succession study. Although human bodies were not possible for the succession study, most of the arthropods collected are necrophagous, and will also possibly colonize human cadaver, and potentially be useful in assisting in estimates of PMI in future forensic cases in Malaysia.

AB - Decomposing carrion provides a temporary microhabitat and food source for a distinct community of organisms. Arthropods constitute a major part of this community and can be utilized to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI) of cadavers during criminal investigations. However, in Malaysia, knowledge of carrion arthropod assemblages and their succession is superficial. Therefore, a study on three types of forensic entomology animal model was conducted from 27 September 2010 to 28 October 2010 in a tropical rainforest at National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Over one month collections of arthropods were made on nine animal carcasses: three laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus, mean weight: 0.508 ± 0.027kg), three rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, mean weight: 2.538 ± 0.109kg) and three long tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis, mean weight: 5.750 ± 0.551kg). A total of 31 433 arthropods belonging to eight orders and twenty-eight families were collected from all carcasses. Among 2 924 of adults flies collected, approximately 19% were calliphorids with Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) being the most abundant. Arthropod taxon richness was lower on rat carcasses compared to that of rabbit and monkey carcasses, and this was more apparent during the first week of decomposition. However, there were no significant differences in Shannon-Weiner index (H'), Simpson dominance index (C) and Pielou's Evenness index (J) between different animal model. The arthropod assemblages associated to animal model were different significantly (p<0.05) while decomposition stage was a significant factor influencing insect assemblages (p<0.05). Analysis on the arthropods succession indicated that some taxa have a clear visitation period while the others, particularly Coleoptera, did not show a clear successional pattern thus require futher insect succession study. Although human bodies were not possible for the succession study, most of the arthropods collected are necrophagous, and will also possibly colonize human cadaver, and potentially be useful in assisting in estimates of PMI in future forensic cases in Malaysia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884768640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884768640&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 24189678

AN - SCOPUS:84884768640

VL - 30

SP - 481

EP - 494

JO - Tropical Biomedicine

JF - Tropical Biomedicine

SN - 0127-5720

IS - 3

ER -