Addressing gaps in ecosystem health assessment: The case of mineral resources

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mineral resources have been concentrated by a variety of geological processes, which operate so slowly by human standards that the rates of replenishment are infinitesimally small relative to its consumption. Once a mineral is extracted and used, it is gone forever. As mineral deposits are finite and exhaustible, they are considered a nonrenewable resource. Modern civilization is very dependent on mineral resources. Minerals are used in the construction industry, the electronics industry, the chemical industry, and many major manufacturing industries. Infrastructure development projects, in particular, require adequate supplies of minerals, especially aggregates, sand, and gravel. One of the most significant impacts of land development in certain parts of Malaysia is restriction on the availability of minerals to sustain the economic growth, due to lack of proper planning (Selangor State Government, 1999). The expansion of urban and industrial areas that encroach upon existing mines and quarries prevent the exploitation of and access to undeveloped mineral resources. If such resources become sterilized, minerals have to be transported into the area concerned, resulting in increased costs to the community.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationManaging for Healthy Ecosystems
PublisherCRC Press
Pages905-916
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781420032130
ISBN (Print)9781566706124
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2002

Fingerprint

mineral resources
ecosystem health
mineral resource
Minerals
Ecosystem
minerals
Health
mineral
electronics industry
nonrenewable resource
nonrenewable resources
construction industry
industry
chemical industry
Geological Phenomena
civilization
state government
mineral deposit
sand and gravel
development projects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Pereira, J. J., & Komoo, I. (2002). Addressing gaps in ecosystem health assessment: The case of mineral resources. In Managing for Healthy Ecosystems (pp. 905-916). CRC Press.

Addressing gaps in ecosystem health assessment : The case of mineral resources. / Pereira, Joy Jacqueline; Komoo, Ibrahim.

Managing for Healthy Ecosystems. CRC Press, 2002. p. 905-916.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Pereira, JJ & Komoo, I 2002, Addressing gaps in ecosystem health assessment: The case of mineral resources. in Managing for Healthy Ecosystems. CRC Press, pp. 905-916.
Pereira JJ, Komoo I. Addressing gaps in ecosystem health assessment: The case of mineral resources. In Managing for Healthy Ecosystems. CRC Press. 2002. p. 905-916
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