Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population

P. Kandasami, Hanafiah Haruna Rashid, Harjit Kaur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is very little information in literature describing ethnic variations in etiologic and clinical outcome of acute pancreatitis in the Asian population. This study describes the demographic, etiologic and clinical course of acute pancreatitis among the three main races in Malaysia namely, the Malays, Chinese and Indians. One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were admitted for acute pancreatitis for the period January 1994 to July 1999 and they consisted of 77 males and 56 females with a mean age of 43.5 years (SD+/- 14.7). The racial breakdown of acute pancreatitis was: Malays 38 (28.6%), Chinese 19 (14.3%), Indians 75 (56.4%) and I (0.8%) patient was an orang asli. The incidence of alcohol association with acute pancreatitis was significantly increased in the males, while gallstone pancreatitis was principally a disease of the female. Alcohol was identified as the predominant factor associated with acute pancreatitis among the Indians (73.3%) and in contrast, gallstone was the commonest associated etiologic factor for the Malays and Chinese. No etiologic factor could be identified in a substantial proportion of the Malay patients (60.5%) when compared to the Chinese (36.8%) and Indians (35%). Severe disease developed in 25% of the cases reviewed but there was no difference in of the rate of severe pancreatitis in terms of ethnic groupings or etiologic factors. The overall mortality rate was 7.5% and the commonest cause of death was multi-organ failure. The study recognises that there are differences in the characteristics of acute pancreatitis among the three major races in the country and this divergence is primarily due to sociocultural habits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-288
Number of pages5
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume43
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pancreatitis
Population
Gallstones
Alcohols
Malaysia
Habits
Cause of Death
Demography
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • Acute pancreatitis
  • Malaysia
  • Racial differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population. / Kandasami, P.; Haruna Rashid, Hanafiah; Kaur, Harjit.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 6, 06.2002, p. 284-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kandasami, P, Haruna Rashid, H & Kaur, H 2002, 'Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population', Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 43, no. 6, pp. 284-288.
Kandasami, P. ; Haruna Rashid, Hanafiah ; Kaur, Harjit. / Acute pancreatitis in a multi-ethnic population. In: Singapore Medical Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 6. pp. 284-288.
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