Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia

A. Quartarone, V. Rizzo, C. Terranova, F. Morgante, S. Schneider, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, P. Girlanda, K. P. Bhatia, J. C. Rothwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dystonia is characterized by two main pathophysiological abnormalities: 'reduced' excitability of inhibitory systems at many levels of the sensorimotor system, and 'increased' plasticity of neural connections in sensorimotor circuits at a brainstem and spinal level. A surprising finding in two recent papers has been the fact that abnormalities of inhibition similar to those in organic dystonia are also seen in patients who have psychogenic dystonia. To try to determine the critical feature that might separate organic and psychogenic conditions, we investigated cortical plasticity in a group of 10 patients with psychogenic dystonia and compared the results with those obtained in a matched group of 10 patients with organic dystonia and 10 healthy individuals. We confirmed the presence of abnormal motor cortical inhibition (short-interval intracortical inhibition) in both organic and psychogenic groups. However, we found that plasticity (paired associative stimulation) was abnormally high only in the organic group, while there was no difference between the plasticity measured in psychogenic patients and healthy controls. We conclude that abnormal plasticity is a hallmark of organic dystonia; furthermore it is not a consequence of reduced inhibition since the latter is seen in psychogenic patients who have normal plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2871-2877
Number of pages7
JournalBrain
Volume132
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Dystonic Disorders
Dystonia
Neuronal Plasticity
Brain Stem
Research Design

Keywords

  • Associative plasticity
  • Organic dystonia
  • Paired associative stimulation
  • Psychogenic dystonia
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Quartarone, A., Rizzo, V., Terranova, C., Morgante, F., Schneider, S., Mohamed Ibrahim, N., ... Rothwell, J. C. (2009). Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia. Brain, 132(10), 2871-2877. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp213

Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia. / Quartarone, A.; Rizzo, V.; Terranova, C.; Morgante, F.; Schneider, S.; Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah; Girlanda, P.; Bhatia, K. P.; Rothwell, J. C.

In: Brain, Vol. 132, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 2871-2877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quartarone, A, Rizzo, V, Terranova, C, Morgante, F, Schneider, S, Mohamed Ibrahim, N, Girlanda, P, Bhatia, KP & Rothwell, JC 2009, 'Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia', Brain, vol. 132, no. 10, pp. 2871-2877. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp213
Quartarone A, Rizzo V, Terranova C, Morgante F, Schneider S, Mohamed Ibrahim N et al. Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(10):2871-2877. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp213
Quartarone, A. ; Rizzo, V. ; Terranova, C. ; Morgante, F. ; Schneider, S. ; Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah ; Girlanda, P. ; Bhatia, K. P. ; Rothwell, J. C. / Abnormal sensorimotor plasticity in organic but not in psychogenic dystonia. In: Brain. 2009 ; Vol. 132, No. 10. pp. 2871-2877.
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