A web-based intervention for social media addiction disorder management in higher education: Quantitative survey study

Huseyin Dogan, Helmi Norman, Amen Alrobai, Nan Jiang, Norazah Nordin, Anita Adnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Social media addiction disorder has recently become a major concern and has been reported to have negative impacts on postgraduate studies, particularly addiction to Facebook. Although previous studies have investigated the effects of Facebook addiction disorder in learning settings, there still has been a lack of studies investigating the relationship between online intervention features for Facebook addiction focusing on postgraduate studies. Objective: In an attempt to understand this relationship, this study aimed to carry out an investigation on online intervention features for effective management of Facebook addiction in higher education. Methods: This study was conducted quantitatively using surveys and partial least square-structural equational modeling. The study involved 200 postgraduates in a Facebook support group for postgraduates. In the study, Bergen Facebook Addiction test was used to assess postgraduates’ Facebook addiction level, whereas online intervention features were used to assess postgraduates’ perceptions of online intervention features for Facebook addiction, which are as follows: (1) self-monitoring features, (2) manual control features, (3) notification features, (4) automatic control features, and (5) reward features. Results: The study discovered six Facebook addiction factors (relapse, conflict, salience, tolerance, withdrawal, and mood modification) and five intervention features (notification, auto-control, reward, manual control, and self-monitoring) that could be used in the management of Facebook addiction in postgraduate education. The study also revealed that relapse is the most important factor and mood modification is the least important factor. Furthermore, findings indicated that notification was the most important intervention feature, whereas self-monitoring was the least important feature. Conclusions: The study’s findings (addiction factors and intervention features) could assist future developers and educators in the development of online intervention tools for Facebook addiction management in postgraduate education.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14834
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Social Media
Reward
Education
Recurrence
Self-Help Groups
Learning Disorders
Least-Squares Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Facebook addiction
  • Intervention features
  • PLS-SEM analysis
  • Postgraduate education
  • Social media addiction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

A web-based intervention for social media addiction disorder management in higher education : Quantitative survey study. / Dogan, Huseyin; Norman, Helmi; Alrobai, Amen; Jiang, Nan; Nordin, Norazah; Adnan, Anita.

In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 21, No. 10, e14834, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Social media addiction disorder has recently become a major concern and has been reported to have negative impacts on postgraduate studies, particularly addiction to Facebook. Although previous studies have investigated the effects of Facebook addiction disorder in learning settings, there still has been a lack of studies investigating the relationship between online intervention features for Facebook addiction focusing on postgraduate studies. Objective: In an attempt to understand this relationship, this study aimed to carry out an investigation on online intervention features for effective management of Facebook addiction in higher education. Methods: This study was conducted quantitatively using surveys and partial least square-structural equational modeling. The study involved 200 postgraduates in a Facebook support group for postgraduates. In the study, Bergen Facebook Addiction test was used to assess postgraduates’ Facebook addiction level, whereas online intervention features were used to assess postgraduates’ perceptions of online intervention features for Facebook addiction, which are as follows: (1) self-monitoring features, (2) manual control features, (3) notification features, (4) automatic control features, and (5) reward features. Results: The study discovered six Facebook addiction factors (relapse, conflict, salience, tolerance, withdrawal, and mood modification) and five intervention features (notification, auto-control, reward, manual control, and self-monitoring) that could be used in the management of Facebook addiction in postgraduate education. The study also revealed that relapse is the most important factor and mood modification is the least important factor. Furthermore, findings indicated that notification was the most important intervention feature, whereas self-monitoring was the least important feature. Conclusions: The study’s findings (addiction factors and intervention features) could assist future developers and educators in the development of online intervention tools for Facebook addiction management in postgraduate education.",
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