A tale of two communities: Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia

Fatin Nur Elyana, Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi, Init Ithoi, Awatif M. Abdulsalam, Salwa Dawaki, Nabil A. Nasr, Wahib M. Atroosh, Mohamad Hafiz Abd-Basher, Mona A. Al-Areeqi, Hany Sady, Lahvanya R. Subramaniam, Tengku Shahrul Anuar, Yee Ling Lau, Norhayati Moktar, Johari Surin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are still major health problems in many developing countries including Malaysia, particularly in the poor and socioeconomically deprived rural and remote communities in Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of IPIs and to identify the key factors associated with intestinal polyparasitism as well as to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on IPIs among rural Orang Asli and Malay communities in Terengganu, Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 340 participants (165 Orang Asli and 175 Malay) aged ≤ 15 years from the Hulu Terengganu and Kemaman districts of Terengganu. Faecal samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, trichrome stain, modified Ziehl Neelsen stain, in vitro cultivation in Jones' medium, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information of the participants and their KAP for IPIs were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Overall, 149 (90.3 %) Orang Asli and 43 (24.6 %) Malay children were infected by at least one parasite species. The overall prevalences of intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli and Malay were 68.5 % (113/165) and 14.3 % (25/175), respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, the presence of domestic animals, not wearing shoes when outside, not washing vegetables before consumption, not washing hands after playing with soil, indiscriminate defecation and the low level of mother's education were the key risk factors for intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli, while working mothers and the presence of domestic animals were the risk factors among the Malay children. Almost all the Malays were well aware about the IPIs while Orang Asli respondents had a poor level of related awareness. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IPIs are highly prevalent in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. Community awareness about IPIs was found to be imperative in protecting Malay children from these infections. An integrated control programme for the prevention and control of IPIs is highly recommended for these communities, with a special emphasis on the Orang Asli population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number398
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

Parasitic Diseases
Malaysia
Rural Population
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Domestic Animals
Parasites
Mothers
Morus
Hand Disinfection
Defecation
Shoes
Water Supply
Drinking Water
Vegetables
Ether
Formaldehyde
Developing Countries
Coloring Agents
Soil
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Intestinal parasitic infections
  • KAP
  • Malay
  • Malaysia
  • Neglected tropical diseases
  • Orang Asli
  • Polyparasitism
  • Soil-transmitted helminths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Elyana, F. N., Al-Mekhlafi, H. M., Ithoi, I., Abdulsalam, A. M., Dawaki, S., Nasr, N. A., ... Surin, J. (2016). A tale of two communities: Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. Parasites and Vectors, 9(1), [398]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-016-1678-z

A tale of two communities : Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. / Elyana, Fatin Nur; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Ithoi, Init; Abdulsalam, Awatif M.; Dawaki, Salwa; Nasr, Nabil A.; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Abd-Basher, Mohamad Hafiz; Al-Areeqi, Mona A.; Sady, Hany; Subramaniam, Lahvanya R.; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Lau, Yee Ling; Moktar, Norhayati; Surin, Johari.

In: Parasites and Vectors, Vol. 9, No. 1, 398, 16.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elyana, FN, Al-Mekhlafi, HM, Ithoi, I, Abdulsalam, AM, Dawaki, S, Nasr, NA, Atroosh, WM, Abd-Basher, MH, Al-Areeqi, MA, Sady, H, Subramaniam, LR, Anuar, TS, Lau, YL, Moktar, N & Surin, J 2016, 'A tale of two communities: Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia', Parasites and Vectors, vol. 9, no. 1, 398. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-016-1678-z
Elyana, Fatin Nur ; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M. ; Ithoi, Init ; Abdulsalam, Awatif M. ; Dawaki, Salwa ; Nasr, Nabil A. ; Atroosh, Wahib M. ; Abd-Basher, Mohamad Hafiz ; Al-Areeqi, Mona A. ; Sady, Hany ; Subramaniam, Lahvanya R. ; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul ; Lau, Yee Ling ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Surin, Johari. / A tale of two communities : Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. In: Parasites and Vectors. 2016 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are still major health problems in many developing countries including Malaysia, particularly in the poor and socioeconomically deprived rural and remote communities in Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of IPIs and to identify the key factors associated with intestinal polyparasitism as well as to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on IPIs among rural Orang Asli and Malay communities in Terengganu, Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 340 participants (165 Orang Asli and 175 Malay) aged ≤ 15 years from the Hulu Terengganu and Kemaman districts of Terengganu. Faecal samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, trichrome stain, modified Ziehl Neelsen stain, in vitro cultivation in Jones' medium, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information of the participants and their KAP for IPIs were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Overall, 149 (90.3 {\%}) Orang Asli and 43 (24.6 {\%}) Malay children were infected by at least one parasite species. The overall prevalences of intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli and Malay were 68.5 {\%} (113/165) and 14.3 {\%} (25/175), respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, the presence of domestic animals, not wearing shoes when outside, not washing vegetables before consumption, not washing hands after playing with soil, indiscriminate defecation and the low level of mother's education were the key risk factors for intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli, while working mothers and the presence of domestic animals were the risk factors among the Malay children. Almost all the Malays were well aware about the IPIs while Orang Asli respondents had a poor level of related awareness. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IPIs are highly prevalent in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. Community awareness about IPIs was found to be imperative in protecting Malay children from these infections. An integrated control programme for the prevention and control of IPIs is highly recommended for these communities, with a special emphasis on the Orang Asli population.",
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T2 - Intestinal polyparasitism among Orang Asli and Malay communities in rural Terengganu, Malaysia

AU - Elyana, Fatin Nur

AU - Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.

AU - Ithoi, Init

AU - Abdulsalam, Awatif M.

AU - Dawaki, Salwa

AU - Nasr, Nabil A.

AU - Atroosh, Wahib M.

AU - Abd-Basher, Mohamad Hafiz

AU - Al-Areeqi, Mona A.

AU - Sady, Hany

AU - Subramaniam, Lahvanya R.

AU - Anuar, Tengku Shahrul

AU - Lau, Yee Ling

AU - Moktar, Norhayati

AU - Surin, Johari

PY - 2016/7/16

Y1 - 2016/7/16

N2 - Background: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are still major health problems in many developing countries including Malaysia, particularly in the poor and socioeconomically deprived rural and remote communities in Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of IPIs and to identify the key factors associated with intestinal polyparasitism as well as to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on IPIs among rural Orang Asli and Malay communities in Terengganu, Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 340 participants (165 Orang Asli and 175 Malay) aged ≤ 15 years from the Hulu Terengganu and Kemaman districts of Terengganu. Faecal samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, trichrome stain, modified Ziehl Neelsen stain, in vitro cultivation in Jones' medium, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information of the participants and their KAP for IPIs were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Overall, 149 (90.3 %) Orang Asli and 43 (24.6 %) Malay children were infected by at least one parasite species. The overall prevalences of intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli and Malay were 68.5 % (113/165) and 14.3 % (25/175), respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, the presence of domestic animals, not wearing shoes when outside, not washing vegetables before consumption, not washing hands after playing with soil, indiscriminate defecation and the low level of mother's education were the key risk factors for intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli, while working mothers and the presence of domestic animals were the risk factors among the Malay children. Almost all the Malays were well aware about the IPIs while Orang Asli respondents had a poor level of related awareness. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IPIs are highly prevalent in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. Community awareness about IPIs was found to be imperative in protecting Malay children from these infections. An integrated control programme for the prevention and control of IPIs is highly recommended for these communities, with a special emphasis on the Orang Asli population.

AB - Background: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are still major health problems in many developing countries including Malaysia, particularly in the poor and socioeconomically deprived rural and remote communities in Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of IPIs and to identify the key factors associated with intestinal polyparasitism as well as to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) on IPIs among rural Orang Asli and Malay communities in Terengganu, Malaysia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 340 participants (165 Orang Asli and 175 Malay) aged ≤ 15 years from the Hulu Terengganu and Kemaman districts of Terengganu. Faecal samples were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, trichrome stain, modified Ziehl Neelsen stain, in vitro cultivation in Jones' medium, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information of the participants and their KAP for IPIs were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Overall, 149 (90.3 %) Orang Asli and 43 (24.6 %) Malay children were infected by at least one parasite species. The overall prevalences of intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli and Malay were 68.5 % (113/165) and 14.3 % (25/175), respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, the presence of domestic animals, not wearing shoes when outside, not washing vegetables before consumption, not washing hands after playing with soil, indiscriminate defecation and the low level of mother's education were the key risk factors for intestinal polyparasitism among the Orang Asli, while working mothers and the presence of domestic animals were the risk factors among the Malay children. Almost all the Malays were well aware about the IPIs while Orang Asli respondents had a poor level of related awareness. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IPIs are highly prevalent in rural Terengganu, Malaysia. Community awareness about IPIs was found to be imperative in protecting Malay children from these infections. An integrated control programme for the prevention and control of IPIs is highly recommended for these communities, with a special emphasis on the Orang Asli population.

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KW - KAP

KW - Malay

KW - Malaysia

KW - Neglected tropical diseases

KW - Orang Asli

KW - Polyparasitism

KW - Soil-transmitted helminths

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