A systematic translation and cultural adaptation process for Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-R21)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire was first constructed to measure eating behavior in an English population in the United States. It has been validated and translated for various populations in different languages. The aim of this article is to describe a systematic process for translating the questionnaire from English to Malay language. Methodology: The report of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research (ISPOR) Task Force was used as the basis for the systematic translation process. The process began with preparation; followed by forward translation (2 independent translators), reconciliation, back translation (2 independent translators), back translation review, harmonization, cognitive debriefing, review of cognitive debriefing results and finalization, proofreading; and ended with the final report. Four independent Malay translators who fluent in English and reside in Malaysia were involved in the process. A team of health care researchers had assisted the review of the new translated questionnaires. Results: Majority of the TFEQ-R21 items were experiencing, conceptually and semantically equivalence between original English and translated English. However, certain phrase such as "feels like bottomless pit" was difficult to translate by forward translators. Cognitive debriefing was a very helpful process to ensure the TFEQ-R21 Malay version was appropriate in term of wording and culturally accepted. A total of four redundant comments in regards to response scale wording, word confusion and wording arrangement. Conclusion: The systematic translation process is a way to reduce the linguistic discrepancies between the English and Malay language in order to promote equivalence and culturally adapted TFEQ-R21 questionnaire.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-434
Number of pages11
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume68
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Eating
Language
Pharmaceutical Economics
Confusion
Patient Care Team
Translating
Malaysia
Feeding Behavior
Advisory Committees
Linguistics
Population
Research Personnel
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cultural adaptation
  • Systematic process
  • TFEQ-R21
  • Translation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A systematic translation and cultural adaptation process for Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-R21). / Ismail, Rosnah; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Shafizah, A. S.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 68, No. 5, 2013, p. 424-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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