A systematic review of occupational therapy intervention for handwriting skills in 4–6 year old children

Masne Kadar, Farahiyah Wan Yunus, Eileen Tan, Siaw Chui Chai, Nor Afifi Razaob@Razab, Durratul Husna Mohamat Kasim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction: Handwriting skills play a significant role in all stages of an individual's life. Writing interventions should be considered at a younger age to ensure proper development of writing skills. Hence, the aims of this study is to evaluate the current evidence of occupational therapy interventions in handwriting skills for 4–6 year old children. Methods: Published literature was systematically searched according to PRISMA guidelines using specific key terms. Initial search identified 785 studies; however only seven met the inclusion criteria and were assessed for final review. Studies were methodologically appraised using the McMaster Critical Review Form–Quantitative Studies. Results: The review found no randomised control trial study design pertaining to the reviewed area. However, it can be seen that occupational therapy interventions for writing skills in 4–6 year old children managed to increase the targeted skills. The results were similar across samples with or without disabilities. An effective integration of occupational therapy interventions into educational curriculum was found to save both time and cost. Conclusion: The long-term benefit from these interventions and the effects of these interventions on a broader spectrum of fine motor abilities need to be explored further with stronger research designs. However, the lack of studies adopting high level study designs, i.e., RCT designs means, results need to be approached with caution by occupational therapists when implementing handwriting skills intervention in practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

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Handwriting
Occupational Therapy
Curriculum
Research Design
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • handwriting skills
  • methodological quality
  • occupational therapy intervention
  • preschool children
  • school-setting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Occupational Therapy

Cite this

A systematic review of occupational therapy intervention for handwriting skills in 4–6 year old children. / Kadar, Masne; Wan Yunus, Farahiyah; Tan, Eileen; Chai, Siaw Chui; Razaob@Razab, Nor Afifi; Mohamat Kasim, Durratul Husna.

In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kadar, Masne ; Wan Yunus, Farahiyah ; Tan, Eileen ; Chai, Siaw Chui ; Razaob@Razab, Nor Afifi ; Mohamat Kasim, Durratul Husna. / A systematic review of occupational therapy intervention for handwriting skills in 4–6 year old children. In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. 2019.
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