A review on the applicability of remanufacturing in extending the life cycle of marine or offshore components and structures

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

One of the most significant and value-added End of Life (EoL) recovery strategies in the Circular Economy is remanufacturing in which the functionality and performance of products are retained. In the marine industry, the intensity of remanufacturing is low compared to other transportation industries such as aerospace, automotive and rail. This paper discusses current issues on Design for Remanufacturing (DfRem) in the marine industry and provides insights into how remanufacturing plays a significant role in enhancing reliability and safety during the extended life of marine products and structures. Today, with the large number of ships approaching EoL, remanufacturing should be the way forward due to its positive impact on the environment and socio-economy. While marine components such as engines, propeller shafts, compressors and pumps have been successfully remanufactured in many parts of the world, remanufacturing of large structures such as hull and vessels have not been reported thus far. As in all other industries, remanufacturing has to be initiated with a paradigm shift in the business models, designing parts and structures for efficient remanufacturing, and the establishment of relevant policies and standards in order to pave the way towards a more sustainable marine industry in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalOcean Engineering
Volume169
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

Life cycle
Industry
Propellers
Compressors
Rails
Ships
Pumps
Engines
Recovery
Marine industry

Keywords

  • Life cycle extension
  • Marine industry
  • Reliability and safety
  • Remanufacturing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Ocean Engineering

Cite this

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