A review on end-of-life vehicle design process and management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, many industrial countries face the consequences of a wide flow of consumer goods and limited product life spans, resulting in a continuous increase in the quantity of used manufactured goods. This occurrence certainly increases the problem of disposal of used products. In this study, of particular interest is the disposal of solid waste from used vehicles. With the facilities of landfill sites rapidly declining due to government legislations, problems of solid waste disposal would continue persist. At present, environmental concerns and government legislations in many developed and developing countries are increasingly guided by the inventor principle, which capitalizes that inventors, designers, or whosoever inflict damage on the environment should likewise remove such damage. This, in turn, has compelled manufacturers to undertake recycling efforts at the end-of-life stage of their products. This entire exercise has resulted in huge implications on the product end-users, producers and the end-product recyclers. Designing for the environment is a necessary concern throughout the life cycle of a product. This means, that the recyclability of a product or its parts should be deliberated on from the on-set, namely from the design, manufacture, use or service, until the end-of-life stage. Management of solid wastes from vehicles considers product recycling by reuse, remanufacturing and reassembling, which is collectively known as End-of-Life-Vehicle (ELV) consequently, this study explores the efforts thus far in published literatures, to implement ELV around the world.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)654-662
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Sciences
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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solid waste
legislation
recycling
damage
vehicle
product
landfill
life cycle
developing world
goods
consumer goods
developed country
recyclability
services
solid waste disposal
world

Keywords

  • Design processes
  • End-of-life-vehicle
  • Recovery materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

A review on end-of-life vehicle design process and management. / Lashlem, A. A.; Abd. Wahab, Dzuraidah; Abdullah, Shahrir; Che Haron, Che Hassan.

In: Journal of Applied Sciences, Vol. 13, No. 5, 2013, p. 654-662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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