A retrospective study of periodontal disease severity in smokers and non-smokers

Masfueh Razali, R. M. Palmer, P. Coward, R. F. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Smoking has been associated with increased risk of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to compare the periodontal disease severity of adult heavy smokers and never-smokers referred for assessment and treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods: A random sample of patients with at least 20 teeth, stratified for smoking and age (5-year blocks, 35 to 55 years), was selected from an original referral population of 1,221 subjects with chronic adult periodontitis. Adequate records for 59 never-smokers and 44 subjects who smoked at least 20 cigarettes per day were retrieved. The percentage of alveolar bone support was measured from dental panoramic radiographs with a Schei ruler at x3 magnification with the examiner unaware of the smoking status. Probing depths at six sites per tooth were obtained from the initial consultation. Results: There was no significant difference in age between groups. Smokers had fewer teeth (p<0.001), fewer shallow pockets (p<0.001) and more deep probing depths (p<0.001). The differences were greater in subjects 45 years of age and over. In this age group, smokers had approximately 13% more bone loss, 15% more pockets in the 4-6 mm category and 7% more pockets in the ≥ 7 mm category than the never-smokers. Conclusions: This study confirmed that smokers had evidence of more severe periodontal disease than never-smokers. The differences increased with age confirming an exposure-related response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-498
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Dental Journal
Volume198
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2005

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Periodontal Diseases
Chronic Periodontitis
Tooth
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Referral and Consultation
Age Groups
Bone and Bones
Periodontitis
Tobacco Products
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

A retrospective study of periodontal disease severity in smokers and non-smokers. / Razali, Masfueh; Palmer, R. M.; Coward, P.; Wilson, R. F.

In: British Dental Journal, Vol. 198, No. 8, 23.04.2005, p. 495-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Razali, Masfueh ; Palmer, R. M. ; Coward, P. ; Wilson, R. F. / A retrospective study of periodontal disease severity in smokers and non-smokers. In: British Dental Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 198, No. 8. pp. 495-498.
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