A prospective study of tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department in Malaysia

Shahridan Mohd Fathil, Siti Nidzwani Mohamad Mahdi, Zuraidah Che'Man, Azhana Hassan, Zulkernain Ahmad, Ahmad Khaldun Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Airway management is an important part of the management of the critically ill and injured patients in the Emergency Department (ED). Numerous studies from developed countries have demonstrated the competency of emergency doctors in intubation. To date there have been no published data on intubations performed in EDs in Malaysia. Methods: Data on intubations from 7 August 2007 till 28 August 2008 were prospectively collected. Results: There were 228 intubations included in the study period. Cardiopulmonary arrest was the main indication for intubation (35.5%). The other indications were head injury (18.4%), respiratory failure (15.4%), polytrauma (9.6%) and cerebrovascular accident (7.0%). All of the 228 patients were successfully intubated. Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) was the most frequent method (49.6%) of intubation. A total of 223 (97.8%) intubations were done by ED personnel. In 79.8% of the cases, intubations were successfully performed on the first attempt. Midazolam was the most common induction agent used (97 patients), while suxamethonium was the muscle relaxant of choice (109 patients). There were 34 patients (14.9%) with 38 reported immediate complications. The most common complication was oesophageal intubation. Conclusion: Emergency Department UKMMC personnel have a high competency level in intubation with an acceptable complication rate. RSI was the most common method for intubation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Intubation
Hospital Emergency Service
Prospective Studies
Succinylcholine
Airway Management
Multiple Trauma
Midazolam
Heart Arrest
Craniocerebral Trauma
Developed Countries
Critical Illness
Respiratory Insufficiency
Emergencies
Stroke

Keywords

  • Airway
  • Intubation
  • Orotracheal intubation
  • Rapid sequence intubation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

A prospective study of tracheal intubation in an academic emergency department in Malaysia. / Fathil, Shahridan Mohd; Mohamad Mahdi, Siti Nidzwani; Che'Man, Zuraidah; Hassan, Azhana; Ahmad, Zulkernain; Ismail, Ahmad Khaldun.

In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 233-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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