A preliminary study of insect succession on a pig carcass in a palm oil plantation in Malaysia.

C. C. Heo, A. M. Mohamad, M. S. Ahmad Firdaus, J. Jeffery, Baharudin Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This preliminary study was carried out in a palm oil plantation in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor in 17 May 2007 by using pig (Sus scrofa) as a carcass model in forensic entomological research. A 3 month old pig (8.5 kg) that died of pneumonio was placed in the field to observe the decomposition stages and the fauna succession of forensically important flies. Observation was made for two weeks; two visits per day and all climatological data were recorded. The first visitor to the pig carcass was a muscid fly, seen within a minute, and followed by ants and spiders. Within half an hour, calliphorid flies came over. On the second day (fresh), few calliphorid and sarcophagid flies were found on the carcass. Two different species of moths were trapped in the hanging net. The first larva mass occurred on the third day (bloated) around the mouthpart, with some L1 and L2 found in the eyes. Reduvid bugs and Staphylinidae beetles were recovered on the fourth day (active decay), and new maggot masses occurred in the eyes and anus. L3 larvae could be found beneath the pig carcass on the fourth day. On the fifth day (active decay), new maggot masses were found on neck, thorax, and hind legs. Advance decay occurred on the sixth day with abundant maggots covering all over the body. The main adult fly population was Chrysomya megacephala (day 2 to day 6), but the larvae population was mainly those of Chrysomya rufifacies (day 4 to day 14). The dry stage began on the eighth day. Hermetia illucens adult was caught on day-13, and a larvae mass of Chrysomya rufifacies was seen burrowing under the soil. This forensic entomological research using pig carcass model was the first record in this country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalTropical Biomedicine
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Larva
Insects
Swine
Diptera
Sus scrofa
Spiders
Ants
Moths
Beetles
Anal Canal
palm oil
Research
Population
Leg
Neck
Thorax
Soil
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Heo, C. C., Mohamad, A. M., Ahmad Firdaus, M. S., Jeffery, J., & Omar, B. (2007). A preliminary study of insect succession on a pig carcass in a palm oil plantation in Malaysia. Tropical Biomedicine, 24(2), 23-27.

A preliminary study of insect succession on a pig carcass in a palm oil plantation in Malaysia. / Heo, C. C.; Mohamad, A. M.; Ahmad Firdaus, M. S.; Jeffery, J.; Omar, Baharudin.

In: Tropical Biomedicine, Vol. 24, No. 2, 12.2007, p. 23-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heo, CC, Mohamad, AM, Ahmad Firdaus, MS, Jeffery, J & Omar, B 2007, 'A preliminary study of insect succession on a pig carcass in a palm oil plantation in Malaysia.', Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 23-27.
Heo, C. C. ; Mohamad, A. M. ; Ahmad Firdaus, M. S. ; Jeffery, J. ; Omar, Baharudin. / A preliminary study of insect succession on a pig carcass in a palm oil plantation in Malaysia. In: Tropical Biomedicine. 2007 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 23-27.
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