A Novel Technique Employing Tapered Fiber Bragg Grating to Solve the Axial/Transverse Forces Crosstalk in Microsurgical Instruments

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the capability of retinal microsurgical instruments constructed with customized fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors to completely decouple the transverse and axial force components. In contrast to the constantly shifting Bragg wavelength, FBG bandwidth can only be tuned when a nonuniform strain/temperature distribution is applied. Using a tapered FBG (TFBG) at the neutral axis of the instrument makes the bandwidth tune-ability possible by applying forces both transversely and axially, while the bandwidth of the outer/lateral standard FBG (SFBG) due to the fiber symmetry remains insensitive to axial forces. Therefore, the crosstalk (transverse forces) in the TFBG can be easily filtered out when mixed forces are applied simultaneously. Tapered fiber mode analysis is carried out to calculate the local modes and is used in the analytic coupled-mode solution. Transfer-matrix method, then, is developed to analyze the reflected spectrum of the TFBG. We provide a developed mathematical model algorithm to show how force vectors can be measured. Tuning the reflected bandwidth is directly corresponding to the amount of the reflected optical power. Thus, the results show that the simulated needle sensors are able to measure transverse and axial forces with a sensitivity of 0.049 and 0.0026 dBm/mN, while the SFBG is insensitive to the axial forces. This novel method is applicable for microsurgical applications, i.e., vascular and cochlear implant surgeries and catheterization procedures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7549006
Pages (from-to)7671-7680
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Sensors Journal
Volume16
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

Fingerprint

Fiber Bragg gratings
Crosstalk
crosstalk
Bragg gratings
Bandwidth
fibers
Cochlear implants
bandwidth
Transfer matrix method
Fibers
Sensors
Needles
Surgery
Temperature distribution
Tuning
catheterization
Mathematical models
Wavelength
sensors
surgery

Keywords

  • Bio-tactile FBG force sensor
  • fiber Bragg gratings
  • microsurgical instruments
  • tapered FBG sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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title = "A Novel Technique Employing Tapered Fiber Bragg Grating to Solve the Axial/Transverse Forces Crosstalk in Microsurgical Instruments",
abstract = "This paper demonstrates the capability of retinal microsurgical instruments constructed with customized fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors to completely decouple the transverse and axial force components. In contrast to the constantly shifting Bragg wavelength, FBG bandwidth can only be tuned when a nonuniform strain/temperature distribution is applied. Using a tapered FBG (TFBG) at the neutral axis of the instrument makes the bandwidth tune-ability possible by applying forces both transversely and axially, while the bandwidth of the outer/lateral standard FBG (SFBG) due to the fiber symmetry remains insensitive to axial forces. Therefore, the crosstalk (transverse forces) in the TFBG can be easily filtered out when mixed forces are applied simultaneously. Tapered fiber mode analysis is carried out to calculate the local modes and is used in the analytic coupled-mode solution. Transfer-matrix method, then, is developed to analyze the reflected spectrum of the TFBG. We provide a developed mathematical model algorithm to show how force vectors can be measured. Tuning the reflected bandwidth is directly corresponding to the amount of the reflected optical power. Thus, the results show that the simulated needle sensors are able to measure transverse and axial forces with a sensitivity of 0.049 and 0.0026 dBm/mN, while the SFBG is insensitive to the axial forces. This novel method is applicable for microsurgical applications, i.e., vascular and cochlear implant surgeries and catheterization procedures.",
keywords = "Bio-tactile FBG force sensor, fiber Bragg gratings, microsurgical instruments, tapered FBG sensors",
author = "Abushagur, {Abdulfatah A Ghaith} and {A Bakar}, {Ahmad Ashrif} and Zan, {Mohd Saiful Dzulkefly} and Norhana Arsad",
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AU - Abushagur, Abdulfatah A Ghaith

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AU - Arsad, Norhana

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N2 - This paper demonstrates the capability of retinal microsurgical instruments constructed with customized fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors to completely decouple the transverse and axial force components. In contrast to the constantly shifting Bragg wavelength, FBG bandwidth can only be tuned when a nonuniform strain/temperature distribution is applied. Using a tapered FBG (TFBG) at the neutral axis of the instrument makes the bandwidth tune-ability possible by applying forces both transversely and axially, while the bandwidth of the outer/lateral standard FBG (SFBG) due to the fiber symmetry remains insensitive to axial forces. Therefore, the crosstalk (transverse forces) in the TFBG can be easily filtered out when mixed forces are applied simultaneously. Tapered fiber mode analysis is carried out to calculate the local modes and is used in the analytic coupled-mode solution. Transfer-matrix method, then, is developed to analyze the reflected spectrum of the TFBG. We provide a developed mathematical model algorithm to show how force vectors can be measured. Tuning the reflected bandwidth is directly corresponding to the amount of the reflected optical power. Thus, the results show that the simulated needle sensors are able to measure transverse and axial forces with a sensitivity of 0.049 and 0.0026 dBm/mN, while the SFBG is insensitive to the axial forces. This novel method is applicable for microsurgical applications, i.e., vascular and cochlear implant surgeries and catheterization procedures.

AB - This paper demonstrates the capability of retinal microsurgical instruments constructed with customized fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors to completely decouple the transverse and axial force components. In contrast to the constantly shifting Bragg wavelength, FBG bandwidth can only be tuned when a nonuniform strain/temperature distribution is applied. Using a tapered FBG (TFBG) at the neutral axis of the instrument makes the bandwidth tune-ability possible by applying forces both transversely and axially, while the bandwidth of the outer/lateral standard FBG (SFBG) due to the fiber symmetry remains insensitive to axial forces. Therefore, the crosstalk (transverse forces) in the TFBG can be easily filtered out when mixed forces are applied simultaneously. Tapered fiber mode analysis is carried out to calculate the local modes and is used in the analytic coupled-mode solution. Transfer-matrix method, then, is developed to analyze the reflected spectrum of the TFBG. We provide a developed mathematical model algorithm to show how force vectors can be measured. Tuning the reflected bandwidth is directly corresponding to the amount of the reflected optical power. Thus, the results show that the simulated needle sensors are able to measure transverse and axial forces with a sensitivity of 0.049 and 0.0026 dBm/mN, while the SFBG is insensitive to the axial forces. This novel method is applicable for microsurgical applications, i.e., vascular and cochlear implant surgeries and catheterization procedures.

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