A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions

Simran D.S. Maggo, Eng Wee Chua, Paul Chin, Simone Cree, John Pearson, Matthew Doogue, Martin A. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multitude of factors can affect drug response in individuals. It is now well established that variations in genes, especially those coding for drug metabolising enzymes, can alter the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic profile of a drug, impacting on efficacy and often resulting in drug-induced toxicity. The UDRUGS study is an initiative from the Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics to biobank DNA and store associated clinical data from patients who have suffered rare and/or serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aim is to provide a genetic explanation of drug-induced ADRs using methods ranging from Sanger sequencing to whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Participants for the UDRUGS study are recruited from various sources, mainly via referral through clinicians working in Canterbury District Health Board, but also from district health boards across New Zealand. Participants have also self-referred to us from word-of-mouth communication between participants. We have recruited various ADRs across most drug classes. Where possible, we have conducted genetic analyses in single or a cohort of cases to identify known and novel genetic association(to offer an explanation to why the ADR occurred. Any genetic results relevant to the ADR are communicated back to the referring clinician and/or participant. In conclusion, we have developed a programme for studying the genetic basis of severe, rare or unusual ADR cases resulting from pharmacological treatment. Genomic analyses could eventually identify most genetic variants that predispose to ADRs, enabling a priori detection of such variants with high throughput DNA tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-69
Number of pages8
JournalNew Zealand Medical Journal
Volume130
Issue number1466
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
New Zealand
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Exome
Pharmacogenetics
DNA
Health
Referral and Consultation
Pharmacokinetics
Communication
Genome
Pharmacology
Enzymes
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maggo, S. D. S., Chua, E. W., Chin, P., Cree, S., Pearson, J., Doogue, M., & Kennedy, M. A. (2017). A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions. New Zealand Medical Journal, 130(1466), 62-69.

A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions. / Maggo, Simran D.S.; Chua, Eng Wee; Chin, Paul; Cree, Simone; Pearson, John; Doogue, Matthew; Kennedy, Martin A.

In: New Zealand Medical Journal, Vol. 130, No. 1466, 01.12.2017, p. 62-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maggo, SDS, Chua, EW, Chin, P, Cree, S, Pearson, J, Doogue, M & Kennedy, MA 2017, 'A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions', New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 130, no. 1466, pp. 62-69.
Maggo SDS, Chua EW, Chin P, Cree S, Pearson J, Doogue M et al. A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions. New Zealand Medical Journal. 2017 Dec 1;130(1466):62-69.
Maggo, Simran D.S. ; Chua, Eng Wee ; Chin, Paul ; Cree, Simone ; Pearson, John ; Doogue, Matthew ; Kennedy, Martin A. / A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions. In: New Zealand Medical Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 130, No. 1466. pp. 62-69.
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