A macroscopic constitutive model for shape-memory alloys: Theory and finite-element simulations

T Prakash G. Thamburaja, N. Nikabdullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, we develop a non-local and thermo-mechanically-coupled constitutive model for polycrystalline shape-memory alloys (SMAs) capable of undergoing austenite ↔ martensite phase transformations. The theory is developed in the isotropic metal-plasticity setting using fundamental thermodynamic laws and the principle of micro-force balance [E. Fried, M. Gurtin, Dynamic solid-solid transitions with phase characterized by an order parameter, Physica D 72 (1994) 287-308]. The constitutive model is then implemented in the ABAQUS/Explicit (2007) finite-element program by writing a user-material subroutine. The results from the constitutive model and numerical procedure are then compared to representative physical experiments conducted on a polycrystalline rod Ti-Ni undergoing superelasticity. The constitutive model and the numerical simulations are able to reproduce the stress-strain responses from these physical experiments to good accuracy. Experimental strain-temperature-cycling and shape-memory effect responses have also shown to be qualitatively well-reproduced by the developed constitutive model. With the aid of finite-element simulations we also show that during phase transformation, the dependence of the position i.e. the thickness of the austenite-martensite interface on the mesh density is heavily minimized when a non-local constitutive theory is used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1074-1086
Number of pages13
JournalComputer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
Volume198
Issue number9-12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

shape memory alloys
Constitutive models
Shape memory effect
austenite
martensite
simulation
Martensite
Austenite
phase transformations
Phase transitions
subroutines
Subroutines
ABAQUS
plastic properties
Plasticity
mesh
rods
Experiments
Thermodynamics
thermodynamics

Keywords

  • A. Shape-memory alloys
  • B. Constitutive behavior
  • C. Finite elements
  • Plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

A macroscopic constitutive model for shape-memory alloys : Theory and finite-element simulations. / G. Thamburaja, T Prakash; Nikabdullah, N.

In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 198, No. 9-12, 15.02.2009, p. 1074-1086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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