A low FODMAP diet is associated with changes in the microbiota and reduction in breath hydrogen but not colonic volume in healthy subjects

Tim J. Sloan, Jonna Jalanka, Giles A.D. Major, Shanthi Krishnasamy, Sue Pritchard, Salah Abdelrazig, Katri Korpela, Gulzar Singh, Claire Mulvenna, Caroline L. Hoad, Luca Marciani, David A. Barrett, Miranda C.E. Lomer, Willem M. De Vos, Penny A. Gowland, Robin C. Spiller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background & aims Ingestion of poorly digested, fermentable carbohydrates (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols; FODMAPs) have been implicated in exacerbating intestinal symptoms and the reduction of intake with symptom alleviation. Restricting FODMAP intake is believed to relieve colonic distension by reducing colonic fermentation but this has not been previously directly assessed. We performed a randomised controlled trial comparing the effect of a low FODMAP diet combined with either maltodextrin or oligofructose on colonic contents, metabolites and microbiota. Methods A parallel randomised controlled trial in healthy adults (n = 37). All subjects followed a low FODMAP diet for a week and supplemented their diet with either maltodextrin (MD) or oligofructose (OF) 7g twice daily. Fasted assessments performed pre- and post-diet included MRI to assess colonic volume, breath testing for hydrogen and methane, and stool collection for microbiota analysis. Results The low FODMAP diet was associated with a reduction in Bifidobacterium and breath hydrogen, which was reversed by oligofructose supplementation. The difference in breath hydrogen between groups post-intervention was 27ppm (95% CI 7 to 50, P<0.01). Colonic volume increased significantly from baseline in both groups (OF increased 110ml (19.6%), 95% CI 30ml to 190ml, P = 0.01; MD increased 90ml (15.5%), 95% CI 6ml to 175ml, P = 0.04) with no significant difference between them. Colonic volumes correlated with total breath hydrogen + methane. A divergence in Clostridiales abundance was observed with increased abundance of Ruminococcaceae in the maltodextrin group, while in the oligofructose group, Lachnospiraceae decreased. Subjects in either group with high methane production also tended to have high microbial diversity, high colonic volume and greater abundance of methanogens. Conclusion A low FODMAP diet reduces total bacterial count and gas production with little effect on colonic volume.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0201410
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Microbiota
Nutrition
hydrogen
Hydrogen
fructooligosaccharides
Healthy Volunteers
Diet
maltodextrins
microorganisms
diet
Methane
methane
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Randomized Controlled Trials
Clostridiales
Methanogens
carbohydrates
gas production (biological)
Bifidobacterium
methanogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

A low FODMAP diet is associated with changes in the microbiota and reduction in breath hydrogen but not colonic volume in healthy subjects. / Sloan, Tim J.; Jalanka, Jonna; Major, Giles A.D.; Krishnasamy, Shanthi; Pritchard, Sue; Abdelrazig, Salah; Korpela, Katri; Singh, Gulzar; Mulvenna, Claire; Hoad, Caroline L.; Marciani, Luca; Barrett, David A.; Lomer, Miranda C.E.; De Vos, Willem M.; Gowland, Penny A.; Spiller, Robin C.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 7, e0201410, 01.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sloan, TJ, Jalanka, J, Major, GAD, Krishnasamy, S, Pritchard, S, Abdelrazig, S, Korpela, K, Singh, G, Mulvenna, C, Hoad, CL, Marciani, L, Barrett, DA, Lomer, MCE, De Vos, WM, Gowland, PA & Spiller, RC 2018, 'A low FODMAP diet is associated with changes in the microbiota and reduction in breath hydrogen but not colonic volume in healthy subjects', PLoS One, vol. 13, no. 7, e0201410. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201410
Sloan, Tim J. ; Jalanka, Jonna ; Major, Giles A.D. ; Krishnasamy, Shanthi ; Pritchard, Sue ; Abdelrazig, Salah ; Korpela, Katri ; Singh, Gulzar ; Mulvenna, Claire ; Hoad, Caroline L. ; Marciani, Luca ; Barrett, David A. ; Lomer, Miranda C.E. ; De Vos, Willem M. ; Gowland, Penny A. ; Spiller, Robin C. / A low FODMAP diet is associated with changes in the microbiota and reduction in breath hydrogen but not colonic volume in healthy subjects. In: PLoS One. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 7.
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abstract = "Background & aims Ingestion of poorly digested, fermentable carbohydrates (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols; FODMAPs) have been implicated in exacerbating intestinal symptoms and the reduction of intake with symptom alleviation. Restricting FODMAP intake is believed to relieve colonic distension by reducing colonic fermentation but this has not been previously directly assessed. We performed a randomised controlled trial comparing the effect of a low FODMAP diet combined with either maltodextrin or oligofructose on colonic contents, metabolites and microbiota. Methods A parallel randomised controlled trial in healthy adults (n = 37). All subjects followed a low FODMAP diet for a week and supplemented their diet with either maltodextrin (MD) or oligofructose (OF) 7g twice daily. Fasted assessments performed pre- and post-diet included MRI to assess colonic volume, breath testing for hydrogen and methane, and stool collection for microbiota analysis. Results The low FODMAP diet was associated with a reduction in Bifidobacterium and breath hydrogen, which was reversed by oligofructose supplementation. The difference in breath hydrogen between groups post-intervention was 27ppm (95{\%} CI 7 to 50, P<0.01). Colonic volume increased significantly from baseline in both groups (OF increased 110ml (19.6{\%}), 95{\%} CI 30ml to 190ml, P = 0.01; MD increased 90ml (15.5{\%}), 95{\%} CI 6ml to 175ml, P = 0.04) with no significant difference between them. Colonic volumes correlated with total breath hydrogen + methane. A divergence in Clostridiales abundance was observed with increased abundance of Ruminococcaceae in the maltodextrin group, while in the oligofructose group, Lachnospiraceae decreased. Subjects in either group with high methane production also tended to have high microbial diversity, high colonic volume and greater abundance of methanogens. Conclusion A low FODMAP diet reduces total bacterial count and gas production with little effect on colonic volume.",
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T1 - A low FODMAP diet is associated with changes in the microbiota and reduction in breath hydrogen but not colonic volume in healthy subjects

AU - Sloan, Tim J.

AU - Jalanka, Jonna

AU - Major, Giles A.D.

AU - Krishnasamy, Shanthi

AU - Pritchard, Sue

AU - Abdelrazig, Salah

AU - Korpela, Katri

AU - Singh, Gulzar

AU - Mulvenna, Claire

AU - Hoad, Caroline L.

AU - Marciani, Luca

AU - Barrett, David A.

AU - Lomer, Miranda C.E.

AU - De Vos, Willem M.

AU - Gowland, Penny A.

AU - Spiller, Robin C.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Background & aims Ingestion of poorly digested, fermentable carbohydrates (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols; FODMAPs) have been implicated in exacerbating intestinal symptoms and the reduction of intake with symptom alleviation. Restricting FODMAP intake is believed to relieve colonic distension by reducing colonic fermentation but this has not been previously directly assessed. We performed a randomised controlled trial comparing the effect of a low FODMAP diet combined with either maltodextrin or oligofructose on colonic contents, metabolites and microbiota. Methods A parallel randomised controlled trial in healthy adults (n = 37). All subjects followed a low FODMAP diet for a week and supplemented their diet with either maltodextrin (MD) or oligofructose (OF) 7g twice daily. Fasted assessments performed pre- and post-diet included MRI to assess colonic volume, breath testing for hydrogen and methane, and stool collection for microbiota analysis. Results The low FODMAP diet was associated with a reduction in Bifidobacterium and breath hydrogen, which was reversed by oligofructose supplementation. The difference in breath hydrogen between groups post-intervention was 27ppm (95% CI 7 to 50, P<0.01). Colonic volume increased significantly from baseline in both groups (OF increased 110ml (19.6%), 95% CI 30ml to 190ml, P = 0.01; MD increased 90ml (15.5%), 95% CI 6ml to 175ml, P = 0.04) with no significant difference between them. Colonic volumes correlated with total breath hydrogen + methane. A divergence in Clostridiales abundance was observed with increased abundance of Ruminococcaceae in the maltodextrin group, while in the oligofructose group, Lachnospiraceae decreased. Subjects in either group with high methane production also tended to have high microbial diversity, high colonic volume and greater abundance of methanogens. Conclusion A low FODMAP diet reduces total bacterial count and gas production with little effect on colonic volume.

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