A gate-to-gate case study of the life cycle assessment of an oil palm seedling

Halimah Muhamad, Ismail Sahid, Salmijah Surif, Tan Yew Ai, Choo Yuen May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The palm oil industry has played an important role in the economic development of Malaysia and has enhanced the economic welfare of its people. To determine the environmental impact of the oil palm seedling at the nursery stage, information on inputs and outputs need to be assessed. The oil palm nursery is the first link in the palm oil supply chain. A gate-to-gate study was carried out whereby the system boundary was set to only include the process of the oil palm seedling. The starting point was a germinated seed in a small polyethylene bag (6 in x 9 in) in which it remained until the seedling was approximately 3 to 4 months old. The seedling was then transferred into a larger polyethylene bag (12 in x 15 in), where it remained until it was 10-12 months old, when it was planted in the field (plantation). The functional unit for this life cycle inventory (LCI) is based on the production of one seedling. Generally, within the system boundary, the production of an oil palm seedling has only two major environmental impact points, the polybags used to grow the seedling and the fungicide (dithiocarbamate) used to control pathogenic fungi, as both the polybags and the dithiocarbamate are derived from fossil fuel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-23
Number of pages9
JournalTropical Life Sciences Research
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Palm oil
life cycle assessment
Elaeis guineensis
Life Cycle Stages
Seedlings
Life cycle
Oils
case studies
seedlings
Polyethylene
Environmental impact
system boundary
Nurseries
Fungicides
palm oils
Economics
polyethylene
Fungi
bags
Fossil fuels

Keywords

  • Environmental input
  • Life cycle impact assessment
  • Life cycle inventory
  • Nursery
  • Seedling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Muhamad, H., Sahid, I., Surif, S., Ai, T. Y., & May, C. Y. (2012). A gate-to-gate case study of the life cycle assessment of an oil palm seedling. Tropical Life Sciences Research, 23(1), 15-23.

A gate-to-gate case study of the life cycle assessment of an oil palm seedling. / Muhamad, Halimah; Sahid, Ismail; Surif, Salmijah; Ai, Tan Yew; May, Choo Yuen.

In: Tropical Life Sciences Research, Vol. 23, No. 1, 05.2012, p. 15-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muhamad, H, Sahid, I, Surif, S, Ai, TY & May, CY 2012, 'A gate-to-gate case study of the life cycle assessment of an oil palm seedling', Tropical Life Sciences Research, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 15-23.
Muhamad, Halimah ; Sahid, Ismail ; Surif, Salmijah ; Ai, Tan Yew ; May, Choo Yuen. / A gate-to-gate case study of the life cycle assessment of an oil palm seedling. In: Tropical Life Sciences Research. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 15-23.
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