A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Problem Students on Clinical Rotations

D. Daniel Hunt, B. A K Khalid, Sharifah Hapsah Shahabudin, Rogayah Jaafar, Jan D. Carline

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    When lecturers teach in the clinical setting, they encounter a variety of student problems. To understand better the perception of the frequency and degree of difficulty associated with different teaching problems, the Association of American Medical Colleges developed a questionnaire describing 21 types of student problems encountered in the clinical setting. This study compares faculty and student perceptions of the frequency of these problems at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine and in two medical schools in Malaysia. Spearman rank correlation tests across all four combinations of faculty and students showed the ranking to be significantly similiar (p <001). UW faculty identified knowledge-based problems as more frequent than the UW students in this sample, who ranked communication and interpersonal skill problems as more frequent. The Malaysian faculty perceived students who were “shy” as more frequent than their students who perceived the challenging student as more frequent. The overall consistency in ranking certain types of problems as relatively frequent and difficult to correct suggest strategies for educational workshops.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)8-12
    Number of pages5
    JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
    Volume7
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

    Fingerprint

    Cross-Cultural Comparison
    intercultural comparison
    Students
    student
    ranking
    Malaysia
    American Medical Association
    Medical Schools
    school
    Teaching
    university teacher
    Communication
    Medicine
    medicine
    Education

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Education

    Cite this

    Hunt, D. D., Khalid, B. A. K., Shahabudin, S. H., Jaafar, R., & Carline, J. D. (1995). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Problem Students on Clinical Rotations. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 7(1), 8-12. https://doi.org/10.1080/10401339509539703

    A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Problem Students on Clinical Rotations. / Hunt, D. Daniel; Khalid, B. A K; Shahabudin, Sharifah Hapsah; Jaafar, Rogayah; Carline, Jan D.

    In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1995, p. 8-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hunt, DD, Khalid, BAK, Shahabudin, SH, Jaafar, R & Carline, JD 1995, 'A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Problem Students on Clinical Rotations', Teaching and Learning in Medicine, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 8-12. https://doi.org/10.1080/10401339509539703
    Hunt, D. Daniel ; Khalid, B. A K ; Shahabudin, Sharifah Hapsah ; Jaafar, Rogayah ; Carline, Jan D. / A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Problem Students on Clinical Rotations. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 8-12.
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