A comparison of Mesua ferrea L. and Hura crepitans L. for shade creation and radiation modification in improving thermal comfort

Mohd F. Shahidan, Mustafa K M Shariff, Phillip Jones, Elias @ Ilias Salleh, Ahmad M. Abdullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Open spaces in tropical climates are highly exposed to solar radiation. These conditions will influence the outdoor energy budget, leading to an increased heat island effect and reduced human thermal comfort. Trees, however, can influence the microclimate through radiation control that indirectly reduces direct radiation uptake and glare by humans and buildings. This condition affects building energy budget and human thermal comfort. This study compares the effectiveness of Mesua ferrea L. and Hura crepitans L. in shade creation and radiation modification in improving human thermal comfort. The study employed two methods: (i) a field measurement procedure and (ii) a computer-based sun-shading analysis using ECOTECT. The results from this study indicate that both M. ferrea L. and H. crepitans L. contribute significantly to direct thermal radiation modification below their canopies. The average solar filtration under the tree canopy for M. ferrea L. was 93%, with 5% canopy transmissivity, 6.1% of leaf area index (LAI) and 35% of shade area. For H. crepitans L. the average heat filtration under the canopy was 79%, with transmissivity of 22%, LAI of 1.5 and 52% of shade area. Thus, the study found that M. ferrea L. was more significant as a thermal radiation filter than H. crepitans L., due to the former's denser foliage cover and branching habit. This significant filtration capability contributes to reduce more terrestrial radiation, cooling the ground surfaces by promoting more latent heat, reducing air temperature by promoting more evapotranspiration and effectively improves outdoor thermal comfort in tropical open spaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-181
Number of pages14
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

canopy
transmissivity
open space
energy budget
leaf area index
heat island
microclimate
shading
foliage
comparison
radiation
evapotranspiration
solar radiation
air temperature
filter
cooling
method
effect
tropical climate
analysis

Keywords

  • Radiation modification
  • Thermal comfort
  • Tree shading
  • Tropical open spaces
  • Urban tree canopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

A comparison of Mesua ferrea L. and Hura crepitans L. for shade creation and radiation modification in improving thermal comfort. / Shahidan, Mohd F.; Shariff, Mustafa K M; Jones, Phillip; Salleh, Elias @ Ilias; Abdullah, Ahmad M.

In: Landscape and Urban Planning, Vol. 97, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 168-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shahidan, Mohd F. ; Shariff, Mustafa K M ; Jones, Phillip ; Salleh, Elias @ Ilias ; Abdullah, Ahmad M. / A comparison of Mesua ferrea L. and Hura crepitans L. for shade creation and radiation modification in improving thermal comfort. In: Landscape and Urban Planning. 2010 ; Vol. 97, No. 3. pp. 168-181.
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