A case crossover analysis of primary air pollutants association on acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children in urban region of Klang valley, Malaysia

S. R. Abdul Rahman, S. N.S. Ismail, M. Sahani, Mohammad Firuz Ramli, Mohammad Talib Latif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children is one of the health effects associated with poor air quality. Objective: This study explores the distribution of ARI cases by subtypes among children in an urban region in tropical country and its association with the air pollution level. Method: Secondary data of primary air pollutants and the ARI data recorded at the selected main public hospital in the same area from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed descriptively using statistical software and spatially through the geographical information system (GIS). Results: In total, 54,542 cases of ARI hospital admission among children were reported with 16 subtypes. Most of the ARI cases were recorded at the general hospital located in the city center (Kuala Lumpur Hospital, N = 27,719, 50.82%), and other cases were distributed at the hospitals located at suburbs (Serdang Hospital, N = 6868 (12.59%), Selayang Hospital, N = 6548, (12.01%), and Klang Hospital, N = 5434, (9.96%). Most of the patients were boys (N = 31,682, 58.09%) and aged below 5 years (N = 45,393, 83.22%). Thirteen ARI subtypes were influenced by the particulate matter with diameter size less than 10 μm (PM10), followed by NO2 (eight subtypes), CO (four sub-types), and O3 (two sub-types). PM10 contributes to high risk of acute bronchiolitis (odd ratio (OR): 1.115, 95% CI: 1.093-1.138), acute upper respiratory infection of multiple and unspecified sites (OR: 1.065, 95% CI: 1.034-1.096), and unspecified acute lower respiratory infection (OR: 1.055, 95% CI: 1.051-1.059). In conclusion, this study supported the theory that children were mainly exposed to air pollution in urban area and they were at risk to experience ARI.

LanguageEnglish
Pages44-55
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Air Pollutants
Malaysia
Respiratory Tract Infections
Odds Ratio
Air Pollution
Geographic Information Systems
Bronchiolitis
Particulate Matter
Public Hospitals
Carbon Monoxide
General Hospitals
Software
Air

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory infection
  • air pollution
  • children health
  • Klang valley
  • spatial Key message: Acute respiratory infections (ARI) were commonly reported among children aged less than 5-year old. PM significantly increased the risk of 13 ARI subtypes.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A case crossover analysis of primary air pollutants association on acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children in urban region of Klang valley, Malaysia. / Abdul Rahman, S. R.; Ismail, S. N.S.; Sahani, M.; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Latif, Mohammad Talib.

In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 44-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children is one of the health effects associated with poor air quality. Objective: This study explores the distribution of ARI cases by subtypes among children in an urban region in tropical country and its association with the air pollution level. Method: Secondary data of primary air pollutants and the ARI data recorded at the selected main public hospital in the same area from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed descriptively using statistical software and spatially through the geographical information system (GIS). Results: In total, 54,542 cases of ARI hospital admission among children were reported with 16 subtypes. Most of the ARI cases were recorded at the general hospital located in the city center (Kuala Lumpur Hospital, N = 27,719, 50.82{\%}), and other cases were distributed at the hospitals located at suburbs (Serdang Hospital, N = 6868 (12.59{\%}), Selayang Hospital, N = 6548, (12.01{\%}), and Klang Hospital, N = 5434, (9.96{\%}). Most of the patients were boys (N = 31,682, 58.09{\%}) and aged below 5 years (N = 45,393, 83.22{\%}). Thirteen ARI subtypes were influenced by the particulate matter with diameter size less than 10 μm (PM10), followed by NO2 (eight subtypes), CO (four sub-types), and O3 (two sub-types). PM10 contributes to high risk of acute bronchiolitis (odd ratio (OR): 1.115, 95{\%} CI: 1.093-1.138), acute upper respiratory infection of multiple and unspecified sites (OR: 1.065, 95{\%} CI: 1.034-1.096), and unspecified acute lower respiratory infection (OR: 1.055, 95{\%} CI: 1.051-1.059). In conclusion, this study supported the theory that children were mainly exposed to air pollution in urban area and they were at risk to experience ARI.",
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AU - Ramli,Mohammad Firuz

AU - Latif,Mohammad Talib

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N2 - Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children is one of the health effects associated with poor air quality. Objective: This study explores the distribution of ARI cases by subtypes among children in an urban region in tropical country and its association with the air pollution level. Method: Secondary data of primary air pollutants and the ARI data recorded at the selected main public hospital in the same area from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed descriptively using statistical software and spatially through the geographical information system (GIS). Results: In total, 54,542 cases of ARI hospital admission among children were reported with 16 subtypes. Most of the ARI cases were recorded at the general hospital located in the city center (Kuala Lumpur Hospital, N = 27,719, 50.82%), and other cases were distributed at the hospitals located at suburbs (Serdang Hospital, N = 6868 (12.59%), Selayang Hospital, N = 6548, (12.01%), and Klang Hospital, N = 5434, (9.96%). Most of the patients were boys (N = 31,682, 58.09%) and aged below 5 years (N = 45,393, 83.22%). Thirteen ARI subtypes were influenced by the particulate matter with diameter size less than 10 μm (PM10), followed by NO2 (eight subtypes), CO (four sub-types), and O3 (two sub-types). PM10 contributes to high risk of acute bronchiolitis (odd ratio (OR): 1.115, 95% CI: 1.093-1.138), acute upper respiratory infection of multiple and unspecified sites (OR: 1.065, 95% CI: 1.034-1.096), and unspecified acute lower respiratory infection (OR: 1.055, 95% CI: 1.051-1.059). In conclusion, this study supported the theory that children were mainly exposed to air pollution in urban area and they were at risk to experience ARI.

AB - Introduction: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) among children is one of the health effects associated with poor air quality. Objective: This study explores the distribution of ARI cases by subtypes among children in an urban region in tropical country and its association with the air pollution level. Method: Secondary data of primary air pollutants and the ARI data recorded at the selected main public hospital in the same area from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed descriptively using statistical software and spatially through the geographical information system (GIS). Results: In total, 54,542 cases of ARI hospital admission among children were reported with 16 subtypes. Most of the ARI cases were recorded at the general hospital located in the city center (Kuala Lumpur Hospital, N = 27,719, 50.82%), and other cases were distributed at the hospitals located at suburbs (Serdang Hospital, N = 6868 (12.59%), Selayang Hospital, N = 6548, (12.01%), and Klang Hospital, N = 5434, (9.96%). Most of the patients were boys (N = 31,682, 58.09%) and aged below 5 years (N = 45,393, 83.22%). Thirteen ARI subtypes were influenced by the particulate matter with diameter size less than 10 μm (PM10), followed by NO2 (eight subtypes), CO (four sub-types), and O3 (two sub-types). PM10 contributes to high risk of acute bronchiolitis (odd ratio (OR): 1.115, 95% CI: 1.093-1.138), acute upper respiratory infection of multiple and unspecified sites (OR: 1.065, 95% CI: 1.034-1.096), and unspecified acute lower respiratory infection (OR: 1.055, 95% CI: 1.051-1.059). In conclusion, this study supported the theory that children were mainly exposed to air pollution in urban area and they were at risk to experience ARI.

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