A case-control study of risk factors associated with rectal colonization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiella sp. in newborn infants

N. Y. Boo, S. F. Ng, V. K E Lim

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To determine the risk factors for rectal colonization by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) Klebsiella sp. in 368 newborns admitted consecutively to a neonatal intensive care unit over six months, rectal swabs were cultured on admission and weekly until discharge. Eighty infants (21.7%) had ESBL Klebsiella sp. cultured from their rectal swabs. Eighty controls were selected at random from infants with negative cultures admitted within the 14-day period prior to the detection of ESBL Klebsiella sp. in the cases. Cases had significantly lower birth weight, gestational age, earlier age of admission, longer hospital stay, and higher proportions of congenital malformations, early-onset pneumonia and respiratory distress syndrome compared with controls. Significantly more cases received mechanical ventilation, nasal continuous positive airway pressure support, total parenteral nutrition, umbilical vascular catheterization, arterial line insertion, urinary bladder catheterization, and prior treatment with antibiotics. However, stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that only two independent risk factors were significantly associated with ESBL rectal colonization: duration of hospital stay [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.3; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.2, 1.4; P<0.0001) and early-onset pneumonia (adjusted OR: 8.3; 95% CI: 1.6, 43.4; P=0.01).

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)68-74
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
    Volume61
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

    Fingerprint

    Klebsiella
    beta-Lactamases
    Case-Control Studies
    Newborn Infant
    Length of Stay
    Pneumonia
    Odds Ratio
    Confidence Intervals
    Urinary Catheterization
    Umbilicus
    Vascular Access Devices
    Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
    Total Parenteral Nutrition
    Neonatal Intensive Care Units
    Artificial Respiration
    Birth Weight
    Catheterization
    Gestational Age
    Blood Vessels
    Urinary Bladder

    Keywords

    • Colonization
    • ESBL Klebsiella
    • Faecal carriage rate
    • Neonates
    • Risk factors

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
    • Microbiology
    • Parasitology
    • Virology
    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Infectious Diseases

    Cite this

    A case-control study of risk factors associated with rectal colonization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiella sp. in newborn infants. / Boo, N. Y.; Ng, S. F.; Lim, V. K E.

    In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 61, No. 1, 09.2005, p. 68-74.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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